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745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151
212 256 0969

Also at:
1222 Flagman Way
Santa Fe, NM 87505
505 984 0044
Yares Art evolved from Riva Yares Gallery, founded in 1964 in Scottsdale, Arizona and in 1991 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Yares Art has since open a Gallery on Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in New York and a private viewing space in Palm Springs. The primary focus is the representation of the Color Field School, including artists Gene Davis, Thomas Downing, Helen Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and exclusively representing Larry Poons. Yares Art has represented the Estate of Milton Avery since 1971.
Artists Represented:
Milton Avery
Fletcher Benton
Byron Browne
Sean Cavanaugh
Gene Davis
Thomas Downing
Friedel Dzubas
Helen Frankenthaler
Hans Hofmann
Martin Cary Horowitz
Penelope Krebs
Morris Louis
Joan Mitchell
Manuel Neri
Kenneth Noland
Jules Olitski
Larry Poons
Esteban Vicente
Works Available By:
Milton Avery
Fletcher Benton
Byron Browne
Sean Cavanaugh
Gene Davis
Thomas Downing
Friedel Dzubas
Helen Frankenthaler
Hans Hofmann
Martin Cary Horowitz
Penelope Krebs
Morris Louis
Joan Mitchell
Manuel Neri
Kenneth Noland
Jules Olitski
Larry Poons
Esteban Vicente

 

 
Installation view of Helen Frankenthaler + LMNOP. Courtesy of Yares Art, New York.


 
Current Exhibition

Friedel Dzubas

Affective Color

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

September 14, 2019 - November 2, 2019
YARES ART is pleased to present Friedel Dzubas: Affective Color, on view in New York, September 14-November 2, 2019. This exhibition, featuring major works by one of the seminal figures referred to under the rubric “Color Field” or “Post Painterly Abstractionists,” marks a special event for Yares Art as it also inaugurates the gallery's expansion to a new additional exhibition space across the hall (formerly the Mary Boone Gallery). Dzubas often worked in large scale to create expansive, panoramic compositions; the combined gallery spaces allow Yares Art to offer a rare, full-view presentation of this artist's remarkable achievement. The show features a fine example of his early, Abstract Expressionist-related works of the 1950s, through to his exquisite, signature paintings from the 1960s onward—immersive compositions with luminous soft-edge geometric shapes activating colorful, ethereal spaces, all realized by means of distinctive, bravura brushwork that is uniquely Dzubas. One of the most ambitious twentieth-century abstract painters, Dzubas (1915-1994) is also perhaps the most traditional, particularly in the matter of his adherence to historic painterly techniques, with a special focus on the fresco painting of the late Baroque/Rococo master Giovanni Battista Tiepolo. The passionate brushwork and the complex color relationships Dzubas favored in canvases such as First Run (1972), Blue Round (1973), and Coat of Arms (1982)—among the highlights of the show—both approach and reflect the celestial brilliance of Tiepolo's work. Mural-size paintings by Dzubas, such as Procession (1975), another exhibition high point, with its rhythmic arrangement of vertical and horizontal rectangular forms, echo the epic scale and the lofty ambition of the best eighteenth-century painters in search of divine light and sublime space. Dzubas was born in Berlin in 1915 and was classified as a Mischling, a person of so-called mixed-race, as the son of a Jewish father and Catholic mother. Early on, he faced hurdles to his artistic education both from his practical-minded father, as well as from the state, which restricted full Jews as well as Mischling access to the Prussian Academy of Fine Arts. On the eve of World War II, Dzubas immigrated to the United States, settling first in Virginia before moving to New York in 1941. Championed by the renowned critic Clement Greenberg, he met Jackson Pollock and many other Abstract Expressionists, becoming in 1948 a member of The Club, along with a coterie of artists that included Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Ad Reinhardt, among others. Dzubas shared a studio with Helen Frankenthaler in 1952, and his work of the period was included in numerous group exhibitions along with that of his likeminded peers. During this same year, his well-received solo debut at Tibor de Nagy was the start of a long and illustrious career. An influential teacher as well as an esteemed artist, Dzubas taught for some years at Cornell University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. A career retrospective of his work was held in 1983 at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. He died in Newton, Massachusetts, in 1994. Dzubas's works are held in numerous prominent public and private collections throughout the world. These include the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of Art, New York; The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, the Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton.

 
Past Exhibitions

Sean Cavanaugh

1222 Flagman Way
Santa Fe, NM 87505

August 2, 2019 - September 28, 2019

Sean Cavanaugh

Under The Elder's Gaze

1222 Flagman Way
Santa Fe, NM 87505

August 2, 2019 - September 28, 2019
YARES ART is pleased to present Sean Cavanaugh: Under the Elder's Gaze, an exhibition of recent works centered on intimate nature studies. The show appears at YARES ART, Santa Fe, August 2-September 28, 2019. Highlighted here are approximately two dozen of Cavanaugh's precisionist oil-on-canvas paintings and luminous works on paper featuring detailed renderings of trees. Cavanaugh's meticulously wrought compositions are often intimate in scale but expansive and powerful in scope and ambition. "Often trees are the oldest living members of the environment, and some are the oldest life forms on Earth," the artist noted in a recent statement. "It is my hope that my work expresses some measure of their presence, quiet wisdom, and beauty." Cavanaugh's sensitive and astute approach to nature studies conveys an increasing sense of urgency today, as the natural environment becomes ever more threatened by recent attempts to reverse environmental protections throughout this country and abroad. Due to the artist's commanding technical ability, a botanist would be able to easily recognize the various species of trees that Cavanaugh focuses on in his work. However, with his subtle and stunning nuances of tone and texture, Cavanaugh's work, on some level, advances the possibilities of pure painting. The painterly aspect of his endeavor is befitting an artist who grew up surrounded by paintings-those of his mother March Avery, and his grandparents Sally and Milton Avery-all artists whose work reflects a special reverence for nature. Born in 1969, Cavanaugh received a Bachelor of Arts degree in both art and environmental studies from Pitzer College in Claremont, California. Having developed his own inimitable painting style over the years, Cavanaugh has held numerous solo gallery and museum exhibitions throughout the country, most recently at the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida.

Fletcher Benton

A-Z

1222 Flagman Way
Santa Fe, NM 87505

June 7, 2019 - June 27, 2019
YARES ART is pleased to present FLETCHER BENTON: A to Z, on view in Santa Fe, June 7–July 27, 2019. This extraordinary exhibition surveys and honors the long and distinguished career of Fletcher Benton, an iconic American sculptor. The Ohio-born, California-based artist, now 87, burst upon the art scene in the 1960s with a series of kinetic sculptures incorporating elements of light that were among the most advanced experiments in sculpture of the day. He went on to produce remarkable abstract compositions in metal that were, and remain today, powerful visual statements that are both elegant and intellectually engaging. On view in the exhibition are some sixty major works that span Benton’s six-decade career. Many pieces on view have never been shown in New York, offering the rare opportunity to reassess the achievement of one of the country’s most inventive and consistently challenging artists, whose formidable contribution to contemporary art has been recognized internationally. Among the show’s highlights are the provocative kinetic works from his “Synchronetic” series, which early on in his career brought him critical acclaim. The mesmerizing orchestrations of light and shadow, as well as the evolving movement, inherent in these pieces have connected him with the West Coast Light & Space movement. Also on view are the sophisticated, thematic “Alphabet” sculptures, whose exuberant geometry addresses issues of language and abstraction in a novel and colorful way. In addition, the graceful compositions in steel, such as the monumental Stainless Steel Donut No. 5 (2012), and a number of various series are included in the exhibition, relating to Benton’s numerous commissions for large-scale public pieces. These works demonstrate the meticulous, innovative craftsmanship, which has been a hallmark of the artist’s work throughout his career. Born in Jackson, Ohio, in 1931, Benton studied at the Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. In 2008, he was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement in Sculpture Award from the International Sculpture Center, Hamilton, New Jersey. He currently lives and works in San Francisco, California. Benton’s work is included in many prominent public and private art collections throughout the world, including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Fletcher Benton is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by David Ebony.

Jack Bush, Gene Davis, Friedel Dzubas, Helen Frankenthaler, Hans Hofmann, Penelope Krebs, Morris Louis, Howard Mehring, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, Larry Poons, Frank Stella, Theodoros Stamos, Esteban Vicente, Jack Youngerman

Fields of Color II

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

May 25, 2019 - August 23, 2019
YARES ART is pleased to present Fields of Color II, an exhibition of major Color Field works, on view in New York, May 25 - August 23, 2019. Presenting works by Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Helen Frankenthaler, innovative artists who used pouring and staining techniques in expansive compositions that changed the course of twentieth-century painting. Also on view are works by contemporary artists, including Larry Poons and Penelope Krebs, who continue to redefine Color Field and expand the expressive possibilities of abstract painting today. Featured in this exhibition are important examples of paintings by Hans Hofmann, the Abstract Expressionist maestro, whose works such as Opulence (1954) and Setting Sun (1957), included in the show, had a lasting impact on the Color Field painters. Rounding out the roster of celebrated Color Field classics are Gene Davis, Friedel Dzubas, Howard Mehring, and Thomas Downing. Among the show's many highlights are Louis's 1961 "Stripe" painting, Third Element; Olitski's brilliant Z (1964), with a magenta orb and a dramatic band of green pulsating against a searing yellow ground; and Poons's panoramic Hunch (2018). At nearly five-by-twenty-five feet, this resplendent work is one of the largest and most spellbinding compositions that the artist has created. With a tour-de-force of painterly acumen, Poons presents an arresting play of color, light, and movement that offers a vital link between Color Field's history and future, a fitting denouement of the exhibition Fields of Color II.

Helen Frankenthaler

Selected Paintings

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

March 2, 2019 - May 18, 2019
YARES ART is pleased to present HELEN FRANKENTHALER: SELECTED PAINTINGS, on view in New York, March 2-May 18, 2019. Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) is one of the most important and influential postwar painters, whose abstract compositions, featuring brilliant ex-panses of color and light, have inspired generations of artists and changed the course of art history. Through her pioneering work of the early 1950s—large-scale compositions made with innovative pouring and staining techniques—she led the way from Abstract Expressionism to a new and vital form of painterly lyricism that heralded the Color Field movement. On view in this exhibition are some twenty major large-scale paintings that celebrate the New York-born artist’s formidable, six-decade career. A classic Frankenthaler work, Swan Lake II (1961), filled with ethereal pools of electric blue, grays, and deep red, against a neutral ground, is a quint-essential example of her unparalleled achievement. Among the show’s other highlights is Pavillion (1971) and Summer Core (1968), both mural-size compositions featuring Frankenthaler’s distinctive, celestial blue tones. Here, the artist explores spatial relationships and the role of color in the composition’s overall emotional impact. In subsequent works, including Closing the Gap (1979), with infinite fields of Venetian red punctuated with touches of orange and lavender; and December Start, showing misty gray clouds traversed by a sensuous passage of pale pink, the artist offers painting a wholly immersive experience. Though fundamentally abstract, other works in the show, such as Las Mayas (1958) alluding to the works of Goya and Scarlatti (1987) to those of Tiepolo, convey a reverence for the lessons of the Old Masters. A legendary figure who rose to art-world prominence at an early age, Frankenthaler studied with Paul Feeley and Hans Hofmann. She knew personally most of the Abstract Expressionist greats, including Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, and Robert Motherwell, to whom she was married from 1958 to 1971. Painted when she was just twenty-three, Mountains and Sea (1952), her first publically exhibited work, now in the collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, is widely regarded as a milestone in the history of art. She had embraced Pollock’s method of painting on the floor and his pouring techniques, but used them for a very different purpose. From early on in her career, she conveyed a meditative and spiritual reverence for nature rather than simply a self-reflective psychological investigation. Frankenthaler thus developed her own esoteric visual language that is universally understood today. Frankenthaler’s work is included in many prominent public and private art collections throughout the world, including the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada; The Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois; Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand; The Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; Bennington College, Vermont; Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, University of California, Berkeley; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; The Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio; Dallas Museum of Art, Texas; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts; National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; The National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania; The Phillips Col-lection, Washington, DC; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California; Seattle Art Museum, Washington; Singapore Art Museum; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Tate, London, United Kingdom; Victoria and Albert Museum, London, United Kingdom; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Wallraf-Richartz-Museum & Fondation Corboud, Cologne, Germany; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut. HELEN FRANKENTHALER: SELECTED PAINTINGS is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by Alexander Nemerov. All artworks © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Fletcher Benton

A to Z

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

January 19, 2019 - February 24, 2019
YARES ART is pleased to present FLETCHER BENTON: A to Z, on view in New York, January 19-February 24, 2019. This extraordinary exhibition surveys and honors the long and distinguished career of sculptor Fletcher Benton, an iconic American sculptor. The Ohio-born, California-based artist, now 87, burst upon the art scene in the 1960s with a series of kinetic sculptures incorporating elements of light that were among the most advanced experiments in sculpture of the day. He went on to produce remarkable abstract compositions in metal that were, and remain today, powerful visual statements that are both elegant and intellectually engaging. On view in the exhibition are some sixty major works that span Benton's six-decade career. Many pieces on view have never been shown in New York, offering the rare opportunity to reassess the achievement of one of the country's most inventive and consistently challenging artists, whose formidable contribution to contemporary art has been recognized internationally. Among the show's highlights are the provocative kinetic works from his "Synchronetic" series, which early on in his career brought him critical acclaim. The mesmerizing orchestrations of light and shadow, as well as the evolving movement, inherent in these pieces have connected him with the West Coast Light & Space movement. Also on view are the sophisticated, thematic "Alphabet" sculptures, whose exuberant geometry addresses issues of language and abstraction in a novel and colorful way. In addition, the graceful compositions in steel, such as the monumental Stainless Steel Donut No. 5 (2012), and a number of various series are included in the exhibition, relating to Benton's numerous commissions for large-scale public pieces. These works demonstrate the meticulous, innovative craftsmanship, which has been a hallmark of the artist's work throughout his career. Born in Jackson, Ohio, in 1931, Benton studied at the Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. In 2008, he was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement in Sculpture Award from the International Sculpture Center, Hamilton, New Jersey. He currently lives and works in San Francisco, California. Benton's work is included in many prominent public and private art collections throughout the world, including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Fletcher Benton is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by David Ebony.

Morris Louis

Spectrum

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

November 3, 2018 - January 12, 2019
YARES ART presents MORRIS LOUIS: SPECTRUM on view in New York, November 3, 2018 - January 12, 2019.The exhibition features a selection of major works by Morris Louis (1912-1962), one of the most renowned and influential abstract painters of the twentieth century, whose work continues to inspire new generations of artists and collectors. In a career spanning less than a decade, shortened by the artist's untimely death, the Washington, DC-based artist expanded the boundaries of abstract painting by creating mural-scale compositions with infinite spaces and pure, translucent color. The sumptuous canvases in this exhibition envelop and enrapture viewers with the mysterious and ethereal luminosity characteristic of Louis's work. On view here are iconic examples from all of Louis's most celebrated series, including "Veils," "Stripes," "Unfurled," and "Themes and Variations." During his lifetime, Louis was known and respected by a small group of critics, curators, collectors, and likeminded artists, including Kenneth Noland and Helen Frankenthaler. Louis's fame, though, is largely posthumous. In the 1950s, until the time of his death, he worked in a small dining room he converted into a studio in his suburban home. Despite the confining make-shift studio, he experimented with pouring and staining techniques on vast swaths of canvas, averaging 8 1.2 by 12 feet. Dramatically divergent from the Abstract Expressionist works that dominated the era, Louis eschewed gestural and textural markings, as well as vestiges of expressive imagery; instead, he aimed toward a purity of vision in terms of composition, color, and light. Monumental in more than one sense, these works eventually came to be recognized as among the pinnacle achievements of the Color Field movement.Today, Louis's vast legacy continues to grow. Among the highlights of the show is Green Shade (1958), a quintessential "Veil" painting, with thin layers of deep green and gray-green pigment covering a large (91 by 134 3.4-inches) canvas. While wholly abstract, the imposing yet gentle cascade suggests the sea-foam mist of a crashing ocean wave. Among other outstanding works, Number 9, a major-scale "Stripe," features tall, vertical lines of brilliant color-blue, yellow, green, red, and orange-sequestered on each side by the unprimed white canvas. More meditative, but similarly riveting, Beta Gamma is a resplendent example of Louis's "Unfurled" series. Here, on each side of the canvas, diagonal, narrow bands of poured, incandescent color frame a vast central expanse of unadulterated canvas-the inimitable and sublime space that this artist so poignantly articulates. Born Morris Louis Bernstein in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1912, to Russian émigré parents, the artist attended Baltimore's Maryland Institute of Fine and Applied Arts (now the Maryland Institute College of Art [MICA]). In 1954, Louis traveled to New York, where he was included in a well-received New York group show organized by critic Clement Greenberg. Louis's work garnered greater attention from museum curators and collectors after being featured in a 1957 group exhibition at New York's prestigious Leo Castelli Gallery. Just as his career was about to be firmly established, Louis succumbed to lung cancer in early 1962, and died, age 49, on September 7th of that year. The following year, his first major solo museum exhibition was held posthumously at the Solomon R. Guggenheim. Morris Louis's work is included in many prominent public and private art collections throughout the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, Museum of Modern Art, and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art;The Art Institute of Chicago; Saint Louis Art Museum; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Baltimore Museum of Art; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Louisiana Museum of Art, Denmark; National Gallery, Berlin; Museum Ludwig, Cologne;The Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Museo National Centro de Arte, Reina Sofia, Madrid; Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel; and The National Museum of Modern Art,Tokyo. Morris Louis: Spectrum is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an introduction by Diane Upright, and an essay by Alexander Nemerov.

Thomas Downing

Spot On

1222 Flagman Way
Santa Fe, NM 87505

November 1, 2018 - January 31, 2019

Larry Poons

Ruffles Queequeg + The Throw Decade 1971-1981

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

September 15, 2018 - October 27, 2018
YARES ART is pleased to present Larry Poons: Ruffles Queequeg + The Throw Decade Paintings: 1971–1981, on view in New York, September 15– October 27, 2018.The show’s unusual title refers to a character in Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, as well as to a pivotal painting in the oeuvre of one of America’s most important and influential artists, Larry Poons. A highlight of the exhibition, Ruffles Queequeg (1972) heralded Poons’s reemergence on the international art scene in the early 1970s as one of the most dynamic and significant leaders of the Color Field movement. While still in his twenties, Poons achieved considerable success and renown in the 1960s for abstract compositions, in the then-new medium of acrylic paint, featuring hard-edge colorful dots and lozenge shapes that pulsate against backgrounds of contrasting hues. One of the most inventive—and restless—artists of his generation, Poons heroically fought against the demands of art-world expectations and moved his art forward to explore novel techniques, processes, and materials. With the “throw” paintings, which preoccupied him throughout the 1970s, he arrived at a lush and sensuous realm of painterly expression that had never been seen before. The artist’s second solo exhibition at Yares Art, New York, includes large-scale canvases, such as Johnson (1973), No More Greasy Boots Allowed in Here (1975), Rain of Terror, and Lycoming (both 1977), all masterful examples of the period.These works confront the viewer with innumerable cascades of pigment in countless hues. In his initial violent act of painting—throwing buckets of paint toward the top of the canvas and allowing the drips to flow down at will—the artist enlists as his accomplices in these works the laws of chance as well as gravity.With an insistent verticality, the compositions create hypnotic, and often meditative, optical effects that are not dissimilar from those found in Poons’s earlier dots and lozenge compositions. Ever changing and evolving, Poons, in subsequent decades, continued to experiment with new approaches and processes.The exhibition also includes a selection of his most recent works, such as Pictures in the Closet and Duco Walk (both 2018), painted with brushes and fingers.These luminous canvases prove that still at eighty years old, Poons continues to refine his extraordinary vision and redefine the possibilities of painting. As ever, his works challenge and impress audiences with their inimitable play of color, light, and movement. Born inTokyo in 1937 to Anglo-American parents, Poons relocated with his family to the United States at a young age, and studied music composition at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Recognizing his greater talent for visual art, he transferred to the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where he studied painting. His career skyrocketed soon after he moved to New York in the early 1960s. Larry Poons’s work is included in many prominent public and private art collections throughout the world, including the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Cleveland Museum of Art; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Georges Pompidou Center, Paris; the Santa Barbara Museum of Art; the Smithsonian American Art Museum,Washington, DC; the Tate Modern, London; the Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, among other institutions. Larry Poons: Ruffles Queequeg + The Throw Decade Paintings: 1971–1981, is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an introduction by Michael Fried and essays by Alex Bacon and Frank Stella.

Milton Avery

Early Works On Paper + Late Paintings

1222 Flagman Way
Santa Fe, NM 87505

July 6, 2018 - September 22, 2018
YARES ART is pleased to present Milton Avery: Early Works on Paper and Late Paintings, on view in Santa Fe, July 6-September 22, 2018. Milton Avery (1885-1965) is a towering figure in twentieth-century art, whose reputation grows more illustrious with each passing year. He developed a unique visual vocabulary inspired in part by European modernism while wholly embracing the American vernacular. Over the years, his work has inspired generations of artists-abstract and figurative painters alike. This extraordinary exhibition features some twenty large-scale oil paintings, including a number of Avery's most acclaimed land- and seascape compositions that he produced late in his career. Complementing these remarkable paintings are about fifty rarely exhibited works on paper from the 1930s, which demonstrate the artist's mastery of watercolor and gouache early in his career. The exhibition presents many well- known works from prominent collections, as well as a number of pieces being shown in Santa Fe for the first time. Among the rarely exhibited gems on view is Hills and Sunset Sky (1964), a luminous masterwork that is the last major painting that Avery completed. Celebrating fifty years of representing the artist's estate, Yares Art is proud to present the gallery's first comprehensive Milton Avery exhibition at its Santa Fe location, after having premiered at its recently established New York venue. Among the many highlights of the show are celebrated masterworks such as the stunning, large-scale marine images Rolling Surf (1958) and Sails in Sunset Sea (1960), which are widely regarded as among Avery's best works. The seascape motif was a favorite for Avery since early in his career. His beach scenes from the 1930s encompass a subtle social commentary in striking pieces such as Swimmers and Beach Scene; featuring crisp line and luminous color, these images depict working-class people enjoying leisure time at the seashore. Avery never created completely abstract works, but his subtly nuanced landscapes and figurative compositions, especially his late paintings, often approach abstraction. He was a mentor to the Abstract Expressionists, including Adolph Gottlieb and Mark Rothko, and led the way to Color Field painting with the novel tonal play and quietly daring spatial relationships that are important attributes of Avery's oeuvre. During his lifetime he was renowned as an "artist's artist," as he incorporated the language of abstraction into a singular exploration of the figure, landscape, and still life. His work remains fresh, vibrant and more relevant than ever for contemporary art today. Milton Avery: Early Works on Paper and Late Paintings is accompanied by a catalogue with essays by noted scholars and critics Eliza Rathbone, William C. Agee, and David Ebony. For further information, please contact: Manuel Garcia: mg@yaresart.com; (505) 984-0044

Thomas Downing

Spot On

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

May 12, 2018 - August 6, 2018
YARES ART is pleased to present Thomas Downing: Spot On, a major exhibition on view in New York, May 12 - August 6, 2018. American artist Thomas Downing (1928-1985) created an extraordinary body of work in the 1960s and '70s, featuring large-scale abstract compositions of pulsating patterns of colorful dots. Born in Suffolk, Virginia, Downing studied at the Pratt Institute in New York. He became a leader of the Washington Color School, or as it is often referenced, the Washington, DC, Color Field Movement. Downing, along with artist colleagues including Morris Louis, Gene Davis, Helen Frankenthaler, Howard Mehring, and Kenneth Noland (his teacher and mentor), experimented with expansive abstractions, often using staining techniques, to create immersive and transcendental realms of color and light. Downing's unique contribution to twentieth-century art consists of mesmerizing canvases filled with precise arrangements of dots in varying sizes and tonal values. In his series "Dial," "Grid," and "Dot" paintings, Downing produced evocative abstract images that suggest movement as well as an infinite space founded on rigorous, mathematically based geometric systems. Downing's work however is intuitive, intense, and highly expressive, rather than coldly formulaic, as his meticulous process might imply. The handmade nature of Downing's work, the paintings' subtle irregularities revealed in the sprays and faint haloes from soaked paint around his circular shapes and in the grids, solidify the idea that the effects of structure and color were more important to him than precise execution. This extraordinary exhibition features over eighteen major paintings that are among the best of Downing's career. Thomas Downing: Spot On is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with essays by noted writers Raphael Rubinstein and Mollie R.Berger, and an introduction by David Anfam, that situate Downing's work within the context of the turbulent era of the 1960s, with its progressive experiments in psychology and science, as well as the work's relevance and importance within the contemporary arts scene today. Thomas Downing's work is held in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena; the Phillips Collection Washington, DC; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Milton Avery

Early Works on Paper + Late Paintings

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

February 24, 2018 - April 30, 2018
YARES ART is pleased to present Milton Avery: Early Works on Paper and Late Paintings, on view in New York, February 24–April 30, 2018. Milton Avery (1885-1965) is a towering gure in modern twentieth-century art, with an illustrious and celebrated career that spanned over ve decades. He developed a unique visual vocabulary inspired in part by European modernism while wholly embracing the American vernacular. Over the years, his work has inspired generations of artists—abstract and gurative painters alike. This extraordinary exhibition features over twenty major-scale oil paintings, including a number of Avery’s most acclaimed landscape, seascape, and gurative compositions that he produced late in his career. Complementing these remarkable oil paintings are fty never-before exhibited works on paper from the 1930s, which demonstrate the artist’s mastery of watercolor and gouache early in his career.The exhibition presents many well-known works from prominent private and public collections, as well as a number of pieces being shown in New York for the rst time. Among the rarely exhibited paintings on view is Hills and Sunset Sky (1964), a luminous masterwork that is the last major painting that Avery completed. Celebrating fty years of representing the artist’s estate,Yares Art is proud to present the gallery’s rst Milton Avery exhibition at its recently established New York venue. Among the many highlights of the show are celebrated masterworks such as Dunes and Sea II (1960) from the collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Other powerful and engaging marine images here, such as Rolling Surf (1958) and Sails in Sunset Sea (1960), are widely regarded as among Avery’s best works. The seascape motif was a favorite for Avery since early in his career. His beach scenes from the 1930s encompass a subtle social commentary in striking pieces such as Untitled (Yellow Swimsuit) and Untitled (Four on the Sand); featuring crisp line and luminous color, these images depict working-class people enjoying leisure time at the seashore. Avery never created completely abstract works, but his subtly nuanced landscapes and gurative compositions, especially his late paintings, often approach abstraction. He was a mentor to the Abstract Expressionists, including Adolph Gottlieb and Mark Rothko, and led the way to Color Field painting with the novel tonal play and quietly daring spatial relationships that are important attributes of Avery’s oeuvre. During his lifetime he was renowned as an “artist’s artist,” as he incorporated the language of abstraction into a singular exploration of the gure, landscape, and still life. His work remains fresh, vibrant, and more relevant than ever for contemporary art today. Milton Avery: Early Works on Paper and Late Paintings is accompanied by a catalogue with essays by noted scholars and critics Eliza Rathbone, William C. Agee, and David Ebony.

Fields of Color

745 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10151

January 13, 2018 - February 17, 2018