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1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622
312 455 1990
Rhona Hoffman, Principal
Betsy Beierle, Director
Jared Quinton, Director
Sofia Macht, Gallery Assistant
Ben Gill, Exhibition Manager
Mid Century to Contemporary American and International Art.
Founded (Young-Hoffman) 1976; Founded (Rhona Hoffman Gallery) 1983
Artists Represented:
Vito Acconci
Derrick Adams
Torkwase Dyson
Spencer Finch
Julia Fish
Natalie Frank
Chris Garofalo
Luis Gispert
Leon Golub
Jacob Hashimoto
Susan Hefuna
Robert Heinecken
Deana Lawson
Judy Ledgerwood
Sol Lewitt
Nathaniel Mary Quinn
Gordon Matta-Clark
Gordon Parks
John Preus
Michael Rakowitz
Richard Rezac
Fred Sandback
David Schutter
Nancy Spero
Siebren Versteeg
Anne Wilson

Works Available By:
Kutlug Ataman
Lina Bertucci
Huma Bhabha
Mel Bochner
Stephanie Brooks
André Butzer
Chris Dorland
Hamish Fulton
Jim Hodges
Jenny Holzer
Richard Hunt
Art & Language
Florian Morlat
Tim Rollins & K.O.S.
Robert Ryman
Lorna Simpson
Yutaka Sone
Pat Steir
Mickalene Thomas
Richard Tuttle
Brian Ulrich
Kehinde Wiley
James Wines

 

 
Rhona Hoffman Gallery
Rhona Hoffman Gallery
Rhona Hoffman Gallery
Rhona Hoffman Gallery
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Upcoming Exhibition

Spencer Finch

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

April 3, 2020 - May 9, 2020

 
Past Exhibitions

The Armory Show 2020

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

March 4, 2020 - March 8, 2020
Image description: Natalie Frank Woman (over the shoulder), 2019 Mixed media on panel 20 x 16 inches

Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Soil, Seed, and Rain

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

February 21, 2020 - March 28, 2020
Rhona Hoffman Gallery is pleased to announce Soil, Seed, and Rain, an exhibition of new work by Chicago-born, Brooklyn-based artist Nathaniel Mary Quinn. This is his third exhibition with the gallery. New paintings and works on paper continue Quinn’s exploration of the human form, testing the boundaries between abstraction and figuration, memory and perception. Rendered in the artist’s signature mode—what he calls “expressionistic cubism”—the deconstructed portraits give subjective form to the connections between Quinn and people in his life, from loved ones and neighbors to more recent acquaintances. Privileging emotional honesty over literal representation, these latest works result from a more intuitive process than Quinn’s earlier portraiture. He builds each composition in response to a few initial strokes of paint laid down on the painting’s surface, allowing this unmediated energy to guide the image. “Those initial strokes are the most fervent, most honest, most genuine,” he says. “Those are the strokes that are far less likely to be controlled or conditioned." The exhibition’s title, Soil, Seed, and Rain, speaks to Quinn's interest in a more elemental, pared-down approach to human connection and form—one drawn from the literal stuff of life.

Gordon Parks

This Land Is Your Land

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

January 10, 2020 - February 15, 2020
“...I feel it’s the heart, not the eye, that should determine the content of the photograph. What the eye sees is its own. What the heart can perceive is a very different matter.” —Gordon Parks Rhona Hoffman Gallery is thrilled to present an exhibition of photographs by Gordon Parks, one of the greatest documentarians of 20th-century American and African American life. Focusing particularly on Parks’ images of African American youth, the exhibition This Land Is Your Land includes works from the 1940s to the 1960s, many of which are being shown for the first time. Children were a subject Parks captured throughout his career. Photographing them allowed Parks to expose contemporary issues of racial, social, and economic inequality, while also often presenting the possibility of a hopeful future. Included in the exhibition is the iconic image Doll Test, Harlem, New York (1947), which documents the infamous psychological experiment that tested the effects of segregation on black children, as well as selections from Parks’ 1956 Life Magazine photo essay “A Segregation Story.” Meanwhile, in the more ambiguous Untitled, Harlem, New York (1963), a young boy stands astride a police barrier—the setting left undetermined to the viewer—exuding a casual self-possession that can only come with youth. Together, the works in This Land Is Your Land attest to the singular vision of one of America’s most important photographers, artists, and advocates for social justice. One of the seminal figures of twentieth century photography, Gordon Parks left behind a body of work that documents many of the most important aspects of American culture from the early 1940s up until his death in 2006, with a focus on race relations, poverty, civil rights, and urban life. Born into poverty and segregation in Kansas in 1912, Parks taught himself photography after buying a camera at a pawnshop. He found employment with the Farm Security Administration (F.S.A.) in the 1940s, which was then chronicling the nation’s social conditions, before his employment at Life magazine (1948-1972). He has received countless awards, including the National Medal of Art, and his work has been the subject of numerous exhibitions, including the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and The Art Institute of Chicago

Gladys Nilsson

New Work

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

September 13, 2019 - October 19, 2019

Chicago Imagists from the Phyllis Kind Collection

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

July 16, 2019 - August 14, 2019

Martha Tuttle

The Dance of Atoms

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

July 12, 2019 - August 14, 2019

Derrick Adams

The Ins and Outs: Figures in the Urban Landscape

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

May 31, 2019 - July 6, 2019

Deana Lawson & Dru Donovan

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

April 19, 2019 - May 25, 2019

Robert Heinecken

Mr. President... Mr. President...

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

March 1, 2019 - April 13, 2019

Signs and Systems

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

January 11, 2019 - February 16, 2019

Michael Rakowitz

The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist (Room Z, Northwest Palace of Nimrud)

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

November 2, 2018 - December 21, 2018

Torkwase Dyson

James Samuel Madison

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

September 14, 2018 - October 27, 2018

Everything is Politics

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

July 13, 2018 - August 17, 2018

Embodied Politic

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

May 25, 2018 - July 6, 2018

Judy Ledgerwood

Far From The Tree

1711 West Chicago Avenue
Chicago, IL 60622

April 6, 2018 - May 19, 2018