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6750 Santa Monica Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90038
By Appointment
310 276 5424
Regen Projects is open by appointment only. Make a reservation to visit the gallery here.
Artists Represented:
Doug Aitken
Kader Attia
Stephan Balkenhol
Matthew Barney
Walead Beshty
John Bock
Abraham Cruzvillegas
Lizzie Fitch/Ryan Trecartin
Theaster Gates
Dan Graham
Rachel Harrison
Alex Hubbard
Elliott Hundley
Sergej Jensen
Anish Kapoor
Toba Khedoori
Liz Larner
Glenn Ligon
Marilyn Minter
Catherine Opie
Manfred Pernice
Raymond Pettibon
Elizabeth Peyton
Jack Pierson
Lari Pittman
Richard Prince
Christina Quarles
Daniel Richter
Willem de Rooij
Wolfgang Tillmans
Ryan Trecartin
Gillian Wearing
Lawrence Weiner
James Welling
Sue Williams
Andrea Zittel

 
Current Exhibitions

Liz Larner

As Stars and Seas Entwine



March 27, 2021 - May 22, 2021
Regen Projects is pleased to present As Stars and Seas Entwine, the eighth solo exhibition by Los Angeles-based artist Liz Larner, whose deep research-based practice is united by a continual exploration of form, material, and color. This exhibition will debut one of the new large-scale floor sculptures and a number of ceramic works that will be included in Below Above, a forthcoming museum exhibition at Kunsthalle Zurich in the summer of 2022. The works on view reveal Larner’s acceptance of Posthumanist thought that the Anthropocene induces as the world becomes beleaguered by rapidly depleting resources and the massive waste that accompanies our extractive industries. The large low floor sculpture, a sea foam/meerschaum drift, seems to billow and surge through the space. The undulating form constructed of conjoined plastic refuse was collected by Larner over the course of three years. Serving as a meditation on the pervasive and exponential presence of plastic in the world, the sculpture is at once beautiful and horrible, a complex combination that evokes the pathos of its material. This Meerschaum Drift’s materiality belies its intricate form and supposes a transformation of crude material into an art object. Plastic-derived acrylic paint applied to its surface gives the sculpture the overall sense of movement in color from deep blue to green to white, evoking the ephemeral quality of sea foam for which it is named. As hinted to in the exhibition’s title, a new series of Asteroid works conjunct the same space as the Meerschaum Drift. These free-form ceramics embody the terrestrial material of their making while illuminating celestial qualities of asteroids, apparent in their form and unearthly looking glazed surfaces. The works stand for the many known and unknown bodies moving in space which contain the real possibility of violent collision, even as their presence and number in our solar system are always being discovered. Investigating the diffractive relation between human experience, cultural forms, material ecologies, and the natural world, Larner’s Asteroids embody a small piece of the heavens as art and ask us to consider our connection to that which is known but is not always seen.

curated by Elliott Hundley

Make-Shift-Future



March 27, 2021 - May 22, 2021
Regen Projects presents Make-Shift-Future, a group exhibition curated by Elliott Hundley, featuring Kevin Beasley, Elaine Cameron-Weir, rafa esparza, Max Hooper Schneider, Eric N. Mack, Alicia Piller, Eric-Paul Riege, and Kandis Williams. "I am interested in studying ancient literature because, like speculative fiction, it can massage loose the underpinnings of our attachments to pervasive contemporary mythologies, so that we might gain a clearer view of ourselves and reveal the blind spots. So many blind spots. Collage and assemblage function similarly by transposing tactile and familiar signs and symbols into new disquieting and uncanny situations. The medium, for much of its history, has scavenged for the discarded, broken, and disused. In this age of abundant material commerce, the predicted age of peak oil, we no longer need to wait to root through the trash. Objects are produced at such a staggering rate, that the time they spend in our lives is forever fleeting on the way to the landfill (tomorrow’s mine). These artists gather objects, valued and valueless, new and used, from their own material worlds. With the stuff of an ever-speeding present at hand, this current moment increasingly feels like the past. This exhibition brings together the work of eight emergent American artists who exploit this excess materiality of global commerce to mine history, to attune us to the meaning and artifacts of other people’s lives, and, I believe, to point to potential futures. Though informed and formed by history, they reject any nostalgia. Like Edith and Sodom or Orpheus and Eurydice, there is no looking back! As assemblage art is assimilated into the canon (see contemporary mythology) it hybridizes and folds back on the more traditional plastic arts. The work in this exhibition includes the full spectrum of the found and the fabricated, and in most cases those distinctions are softened again through artistry. The labor of the artist seems always relevant, intermingled with the labor that produced these original objects in the first place. Did they make this stitch or that one? The intensity of the artist’s hand and this doubling of the making of these objects lend them their charge. As with an artwork in the studio, unexpected meanings and connections reveal themselves in exhibitions. Seeing these works together, what emerged was a particular concern for the body and protecting it in different stages of life. The incubator, the skin, clothing, shoes, blankets, armor: What will we put on to keep us safe? What will we carry to keep us safe? What will help us in the future? What will liberate us?" — Elliott Hundley

 
Past Exhibitions

Doug Aitken

Flags and Debris



January 16, 2021 - March 13, 2021
Regen Projects is pleased to present Flags and Debris, an exhibition of new work by Los Angeles-based artist Doug Aitken. The works form an ecosystem of interconnected mediums, mixing dance, performance, film, sculpture, and handmade objects. Each plays off the other, creating a choreography of images, language, and sound. The exhibition comprises all new work conceived in the last 10 months, a time of profound change in the face of the pandemic. The body of work reflects the tension collectively felt between our isolation from the physical landscape of the exterior world and newly created spaces for turning inward to explore the subconscious landscape. At heart, the works are a portrait of a society moving toward the future. Flags and Debris consists of a new series of handmade fabric wall hangings and a hallucinatory multi-screen installation. The fabric works were generated during lockdown when, searching for materials inside his home, Aitken began to cut clothes and fabrics. From these materials he created shapes to articulate words and phrases that spoke of a shifting world in continuous change. Conversely, the physical process of creating these works was a study of stillness. They resemble flags and banners while also suggesting protective coverings for warmth and security. The collaged layers of fabric build into visual and written abstractions. These works provoke reflection on the nature of reality and visions of the future: Fragmented phrases like ‘Noise,’ ‘Digital Detox,’ ‘Data Mining,’ ‘Nowhere/Somewhere,’ and ‘Resist Algorithms’ appear like handcrafted digital glitches, while other works ruminate in full prose, including an excerpt from a text by Joan Didion, whose writing has served as an inspiration to Aitken. Aitken also initiated a series of impromptu performances throughout Los Angeles using the new fabric works. He filmed these performances, translating them into the new multi-screen installation. The performances are based on choreographies Aitken developed working with LA Dance Project. Wrapped in the artworks, the dancers moved through desolate industrial locations and empty urban spaces. Their movements were unique to each setting, activating the spaces with kinetic energy. The film captures fleeting moments and mysterious and random encounters. Sleepwalking bodies are wrapped and covered, moving, jerking, fighting, and thrusting through the nocturnal, desolate city. The fabric moves through the wind as though empty — phantom presences roaming through spaces. The film reflects snapshots of a surreal life, as if seen out of the corner of the eye, pushing one to explore a modern landscape that is in continuous flux. It is set in shadowland spaces such as freeway underpasses, urban rivers, and desolate industrial areas where empty sites are transformed from passive to active. Bodies occupying the artworks shapeshift under the layers of fabric in movements that explore the unseen and hidden worlds of interior thought. In discussing the work Aitken said, “Flags and Debris acts like a kaleidoscopic mirror, reflecting a broken narrative landscape. Pulses of electricity merge with the human heartbeat through a landscape that is expansive and anonymous. As we look at these artworks, we stand looking at a horizon transfixed at what could be, uncertain of where we are positioned, but looking towards the possibilities of the future.” The exhibition furthermore extends outside the gallery walls by way of a poster campaign wheat-pasted across Los Angeles. Containing a QR code, the posters act as virtual portals, expanding the art experience to anyone — anywhere — in the city. Ubiquitous and yet hidden in plain sight, the posters are an egalitarian art encounter, further blurring the boundary between our physical and digital realities. Those with the curiosity to engage with it are transported in place to an experience of Los Angeles as they have never seen it before. Aitken would like to thank LA Dance Project and Sébastien Marcovici for their participation in this project, and in particular, the talented dancers Anthony Lee Bryant, David Adrian Freeland, Jr., Mario Gonzalez, Vinicius Silva, and Nayomi Van Brunt. Image: Target, 2020. Hand dyed cotton, 116 x 118 1/2 inches (294.6 x 301 cm).

Kader Attia

The Valley of Dreams



November 12, 2020 - December 23, 2020

James Welling

Archaeology



September 26, 2020 - October 31, 2020

Raymond Pettibon

Pacific Ocean Pop



September 12, 2020 - October 31, 2020

Andrea Zittel

Works 2005 – 2020



July 13, 2020 - August 21, 2020

Catherine Opie

Rhetorical Landscapes



February 27, 2020 - April 4, 2020

Lawrence Weiner

ON VIEW



February 27, 2020 - April 4, 2020

Anish Kapoor



January 11, 2020 - February 16, 2020

Alex Hubbard

The Corner of the Table



November 16, 2019 - December 21, 2019

Theaster Gates

Line Drawing for Shirt and Cloak



September 14, 2019 - November 2, 2019

Daniel Richter

H.P. (jah allo)



June 29, 2019 - August 17, 2019

Elliott Hundley



May 17, 2019 - June 22, 2019

Liz Larner



May 17, 2019 - June 22, 2019

Christina Quarles

But I Woke Jus’ Tha Same



April 6, 2019 - May 9, 2019

Glenn Ligon

Untitled (America)/Debris Field/Synecdoche/Notes for a Poem on the Third World



January 12, 2019 - February 17, 2019

Tavares Strachan

Invisibles



November 2, 2018 - December 22, 2018

Lari Pittman

Portraits of Textiles & Portraits of Humans



September 15, 2018 - October 27, 2018

Dan Graham

New Works By A Small-Town Boy



July 7, 2018 - August 18, 2018

Marilyn Minter



May 19, 2018 - June 23, 2018

Sue Williams



April 14, 2018 - May 12, 2018

Walead Beshty

Equivalents



March 2, 2018 - April 7, 2018