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456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011
212 680 9467

Also at:
35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065
212 680 9467
Friedrich Petzel Gallery, founded in 1994, first opened on Wooster Street in the Soho area of New York City. In 2000, the gallery moved to 537 West 22nd Street in Chelsea and in 2006 expanded to include a separate space next door dedicated to smaller exhibitions, artists' projects, and performances. In Fall 2008, Friedrich Petzel Gallery opened a joint gallery with Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne. This new gallery, called Capitain Petzel, is housed in a glass-encased gallery located in Mitte section of Berlin and presents exhibitions of established international artists. After eleven years on 22nd Street, Petzel Gallery closed this space, expanding into a new location at 456 18th Street in 2012.  In March of 2015, Petzel opened a second space in New York, a new, uptown location at 35 East 67th Street. Situated in a townhouse, the new gallery will curate historic exhibitions by artists within the Petzel program as well as focus on curatorial projects and publishing activities. Both galleries in New York are complimented by Capitain Petzel in Berlin. The move to the new, larger 18th Street location and expansion uptown continue Petzel Gallery’s commitment to develop its program upon the scope, diversity, and ambitions of the artists that it represents.

Friedrich Petzel Gallery has continued to develop its program around a group of contemporary artists who are renowned internationally: Yael Bartana, Walead Beshty, Cosima von Bonin, Troy Brauntuch, Simon Denny, Keith Edmier, Thomas Eggerer, Wade Guyton, Georg Herold, Charline von Heyl, Dana Hoey, Christian Jankowski, Sean Landers, Rezi van Lankveld, Maria Lassnig, Allan McCollum, Adam McEwen, Sarah Morris, Jorge Pardo, Joyce Pensato, Seth Price, Stephen Prina, Jon Pylypchuk, Willem de Rooij, Dana Schutz, Dirk Skreber, John Stezaker, Nicola Tyson, Corinne Wasmuht, and Heimo Zobernig. Each artist has exhibited widely in both museums and galleries throughout the world and are regularly included in international exhibitions such as Documenta, the Whitney Biennial, The Carnegie International, and the São Paulo Biennial. Numerous publications are available on all the gallery artists.

Friedrich Petzel Gallery also deals in outstanding artworks from the last thirty years by artists such as: Robert Gober, Mike Kelley, Martin Kippenberger, Jeff Koons, Louise Lawler, John Miller, Albert Oehlen, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Thomas Struth, and Christopher Wool.
Artists Represented:
Yael Bartana
Walead Beshty
Ross Bleckner
Cosima von Bonin
Troy Brauntuch
Simon Denny
Keith Edmier
Thomas Eggerer
Derek Fordjour
Wade Guyton
Robert Heinecken
Stefanie Heinze
Georg Herold
Charline von Heyl
Dana Hoey
Christian Jankowski
Asger Jorn
Sean Landers
Rezi van Lankveld
Maria Lassnig
Allan McCollum
Adam McEwen
Rodney McMillian
Sarah Morris
Jorge Pardo
Joyce Pensato
Seth Price
Stephen Prina
Jon Pylypchuk
Willem de Rooij
Pieter Schoolwerth
Dana Schutz
Dirk Skreber
John Stezaker
Hiroki Tsukuda
Nicola Tyson
Corinne Wasmuht
Heimo Zobernig

 

 
35 East 67th Street, interior view
456 West 18th Street, exterior view
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Online Programming

Yael Bartana, Walead Beshty, Ross Bleckner, Simon Denny, Keith Edmier, Thomas Eggerer, Robert Heinecken, Dana Hoey, Christian Jankowski, Sean Landers, Rezi van Lankveld, Allan McCollum, Jorge Pardo, Seth Price, Stephen Prina, Jon Pylypchuk, Willem de Rooij, Pieter Schoowerth, John Stezaker, and Hiroki Tsukuda

Downloadable

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

Petzel is pleased to present Downloadable, an online exhibition that offers works available for free and unlimited download, contributed by Petzel artists. The show explores ideas of looking, ownership, and originality as art experiences have been forced into the digital realm. We now find ourselves drowning in emails touting various iterations of virtual exhibitions, walk throughs, viewing rooms, and art fairs. With our pleasure of seeing works in person disrupted, the notion of looking at art has radically shifted. While the digital files may be the same for all visitors, the experience and context surrounding each download is different, and as a result a new unique work is created for the viewer every time. Petzel is grateful for our artists’ contributions with offerings from GIFs, to collages, to poetry, photographs, audio files, screenplays and beyond. Stephen Prina presents Threatening Danger, Fear, Catastrophe, a video animation of a rhythmic light sequence, looping in perpetuity. Once imagined as a public artwork, it incorporates lampposts that shine in two different ways. The title is a reference to Schönberg's symphonic poem Accompaniment to a Cinematographic Scene, first realized as a film score by Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub in the 1972 film Introduction to Arnold Schönberg's "Accompaniment to a Cinematographic Scene." Flattened through their digitization, the sculptural qualities and textures of Rezi van Lankveld’s collage and drawing transform into something new. Thomas Eggerer’s original Drawing for Yellow Harvest #4 was destroyed in Hurricane Sandy leaving behind only a digital trace – here, as part of the exhibition, its jpeg finds a poetic afterlife. Several artists request collaboration on the downloader’s part: Jorge Pardo has begun the process of adding color to a painting, and invites the downloader to complete the composition; Christian Jankowski calls for participation in his new work Jankowski 4.0, by requesting that viewers create a Dada Poem via an online Poetry Generator and film themselves reading it. The video is then to be posted on Instagram using the hashtag #Jankowski4.0; Allan McCollum offers ever-evolving insight into his practice and requires viewers to take their own screenshots from his new website as a form of downloading. Through an array of experiences, Downloadable bends the definition of collecting an artist’s work and experiencing an exhibition today. Downloadable includes work by Yael Bartana, Walead Beshty, Ross Bleckner, Simon Denny, Keith Edmier, Thomas Eggerer, Robert Heinecken, Dana Hoey, Christian Jankowski, Sean Landers, Rezi van Lankveld, Allan McCollum, Jorge Pardo, Seth Price, Stephen Prina, Jon Pylypchuk, Willem de Rooij, Pieter Schoowerth, John Stezaker, and Hiroki Tsukuda.

Walead Beshty, Ross Bleckner, Cosima von Bonin, Fiona Connor, Wade Guyton, Allan McCollum, Sarah Morris, Seth Price, Pieter Schoolwerth, and Rirkrit Tiravanija

Community Board

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

Petzel is pleased to present Community Board, an online exhibition highlighting artists who rely on, and incorporate, their communities and networks to realize their work. At a time when our communities are forcefully insular and our social and physical dynamics are drastically changing due to the implications of COVID-19, the relationships and systems of support we have maintained are arguably more important than ever. These links are the results of both physical closeness, as with roommates or doctors, as well as emotional closeness, whether that is calling home, a wedding officiated over Zoom, or somewhere in between with a shared demand for justice and change through protest. These relationships and interactions correlate with what we have decided is most important to focus our energy on in the current state. The works included in Community Board, all executed pre-pandemic, are transformed under our new circumstances. Community Board presents the dichotomy of our more intimate and personal bonds alongside the virtual connections that are increasingly prominent in our lives, to explore what community means today. Community Board includes works by Walead Beshty, Ross Bleckner, Cosima von Bonin, Fiona Connor, Wade Guyton, Allan McCollum, Sarah Morris, Seth Price, Pieter Schoolwerth, and Rirkrit Tiravanija.

An Online Portrait Show

What Can a Face Do?

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

Petzel is pleased to present What Can a Face Do?, an online exhibition of works exploring portraiture and its many forms and interpretations. In the current pandemic state, our noses and mouths are covered with masks, which prohibits us from seeing each other face to face. As a result, the portrait becomes especially urgent as a model of representation: the face expresses and reveals the inner feelings of a person; it shows something that is hidden behind the facade, yet there is something in the appearance of a face that allows access to what is hidden beneath. This exhibition brings together a selection of works concentrated around the idea of faces, presenting a visual “group portrait” that highlights the relevancy of portraiture today. What Can a Face Do? includes work by Yael Bartana, Keith Edmier, Asger Jorn, Sean Landers, Rezi van Lankveld, Maria Lassnig, Jorge Pardo, Joyce Pensato, Jon Pylypchuk, and Nicola Tyson.

Maria Lassnig

Ode to New York: Drawings 1968–1980

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

Petzel is pleased to present an online exhibition of works on paper by Austrian artist Maria Lassnig. Developed in close collaboration with the Maria Lassnig Foundation, the exhibition comprises six watercolors and nine pencil drawings depicting Maria Lassnig’s time in New York City from 1968–1980, alongside film footage shot by Lassnig documenting her fascination with the performers, musicians, and pedestrian dancers that she encountered on the pulsating streets of Manhattan. In scenes captured by Lassnig from the parks, rooftops, and windows of 1970s New York, we observe an artist as she revels in the liberation of a new, American landscape. From cityscapes to skylines, abstracted self-portraits, and moments in the famed Chelsea Hotel, Lassnig chronicles both herself and her surroundings in a sweeping ode to New York. In 1968, at the age of 49, Lassnig moved from her home in Paris to New York City, to be in, as she called it, “the country of strong women." Although well-known in her native Austria, Lassnig was virtually unheard of in the United States and lived, for the next 12 years, in relative anonymity, renting walk-up apartments on the Lower East Side and Soho. According to those who knew her, she felt an affinity with the City; loved its constant activity, dynamism and the sense of freedom it engendered. New York City offered Lassnig a liberation of sorts from the male-dominated art scene of Europe. It gave her the opportunity to be an artist, not simply a female artist — and she worked prolifically, producing paintings, drawings, watercolors, silkscreen prints and animated films, often including hints of Americana in her work. Lassnig’s New York years were an incredibly formative time for the artist, a period in which she further developed her singular “body sensation” or “body awareness” aesthetic of the late 1940s – using sensations of the body as conduits to envision the external world. Her self-reflective pencil drawings from this period exemplify how Lassnig also turned toward realism identified with portraiture. These drawings reflect how the artistic freedom Lassnig enjoyed in the City allowed her to experiment in other art forms, including film. She even went on to study animated film at the School of Visual Arts for one semester in the spring of 1971, and in 1974 she co-founded the Women/Artist/Filmmakers, Inc., a group of feminist filmmakers. Petzel’s much-anticipated exhibition Maria Lassnig: The Paris Years, 1960-68, which was originally scheduled to open this spring, will now open in April 2021 and will be accompanied by a catalog with an essay by Lauren O'Neill-Butler.

Yael Bartana, Thomas Eggerer, Sean Landers, Adam McEwen, Rodney McMillian, Sarah Morris, Seth Price, Stephen Prina, Dirk Skreber, John Stezaker, Nicola Tyson, and Corinne Wasmuht.

21st Century Landscapes

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

While landscape painting dates back to antiquity, it only became a serious genre when artists began using landscapes as a retreat from the complexities of modern life. The 19th century brought landscapes to the forefront through plein air techniques. The landscape became a reflection of the philosophy when previously, landscapes were simply an image of pastoral idyll. The effects of the anthropocene on art have intensified with time. Today we are faced with new challenges: climate change, environmental destruction, and population density. The 21st century has an even more strained relationship with nature and an even greater dependence on technology. Our ecological crisis marked the collapse of traditional landscape, and modern gives way to contemporary. We have a radical new conceptualization of landscape, no longer tethered to factual depiction. Our perception is distorted by digital aesthetics which results in new, imagined landscapes. Scenes that could only be afforded by contemporary technology are present in the works by Yael Bartana, Thomas Eggerer, Sean Landers, Adam McEwen, Rodney McMillian, Sarah Morris, Seth Price, Stephen Prina, Dirk Skreber, John Stezaker, Nicola Tyson, and Corinne Wasmuht. Today, we can only dream of the bucolic landscapes of the past while we try to make sense of the present.

Nicola Tyson

Works on Paper

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

New graphite drawings on paper alongside time-lapse footage documenting the artist's process. "When I begin to draw, I have no idea what's going to appear. I work swiftly, to stay just ahead of the cage of language, the linear mind and rational decision-making. I just let the forms grow themselves—self-organize..." –Nicola Tyson

Allan McCollum

Early Works

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

On the occasion of Allan McCollum’s first US museum retrospective currently mounted at the ICA Miami, Petzel is pleased to present a special online exhibition of the artist’s rarely seen early paintings. Though the ICA Miami is temporarily closed due to COVID concerns, the show will be extended upon reopening and will subsequently travel to the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum in St. Louis. Over the past 50 years, McCollum has explored how objects achieve public and personal meaning in a world caught up in the contradictions between unique handmade artworks and objects of mass production. The works presented here focus on some of his earliest forays into art: the Bleach Paintings and Constructed Paintings. Dating from the early 1970s, they represent a key transitional moment anticipating the artist’s lifelong preoccupation with serial production and strategies of display.

 
Current Exhibitions

Stefanie Heinze

Frail Juice

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

October 7, 2020 - November 7, 2020
Petzel Gallery is pleased to present Frail Juice, a solo exhibition of new paintings and their corresponding drawings by Berlin-based artist Stefanie Heinze. On view from October 7 to November 7, on the parlor floor of Petzel’s Upper East Side gallery, the show marks Heinze’s debut exhibition at Petzel and second solo show in New York. Encompassing six paintings (all 2020), and four works on paper — two shown as double-sided drawings on pedestals — the works in the show explore the dissolution of historical norms and the paradoxes that arise when investigating power structures. Heinze works from a process of coupling collaged drawings to paintings, starting on paper not strictly as studies but as companions. For Heinze, the act of drawing and collaging is a form of intuitive notetaking that then becomes a retracing of thoughts, almost like attempting to remember a dream, when applied to canvas. She aims to portray the familiar in ways she feels she has not yet seen; relatable objects take on new identities, complicated within the painting process and the translation from lines and ink into a repetition of shapes that fall somewhere between the figurative and the abstract. Her colors work in unexpected ways in vividly subversive worlds, what might first appear as a surrealist landscape will, in fact, turn out to be something else entirely. For this show, Heinze’s signature fantastic and impossible encounters, composed of playful, transformative, and (a)sexual motifs, are on full display. In these works, Heinze gives emphasis to the “small beings” — the subordinate, the banal — as memory mixes with utopian visions in surprising moments across canvas. She extracts the more indigestible themes of everyday life into fluid landscapes of absurd creations where giant eggplants and raspberry globules whiz around the composition, circling a puppy donning makeup, or a professor wearing many sets of glasses resting on multiple noses. The exhibition is made up, in part, by two large diptychs of oil and acrylic on canvas — A Hollow Place in a Solid Body and Innerspring. In the former, a yellow canary, morphs into various states of being, ghostlike, while attempting to find a safe surrounding in a strident neon orange-pink background. Illustrated in plastic states of becoming something new, dynamic, and sensual, the birds are vulnerable yet resilient. Canaries appear in many of Heinze’s past works — she began drawing the figure in childhood when her family had one as a pet. She sees them as both loners and survivors, watching scenes play out with no autonomy over their life, while standing in as a friend, an ally, or perhaps even, a witness. The second diptych, Innerspring matches the first in both dimension, orientation, and its centrally focused composition, with a mirroring horizon-like strip at the bottom of the tableau. Despite these visual similarities, the forms and objects described in Innerspring are directly opposite the vulnerability depicted in A Hollow Place. Steel chains, tousled mattresses, processed foods, and phallic forms protrude in a chaotic scene that seems to represent something much more repulsive: exuding dominance, influence, and entitlement, yet all characterized with a rather ridiculous flair. This tension appears and reappears in various approaches across the exhibition, where traditional, rigid, and patriarchal structures become as banal as everything and everyone else. On one hand “frail” implies deficiency, and on the other, “juice” signals abundance — it drips, oozes, seeps, and flows, malleable and nourishing. Heinze asks us to explore the strength that lies within fragility, and what propositions of alternative forms of power and relation could look like. In the short time since graduating from the Academy of Fine Arts in Leipzig, Heinze has exhibited widely. She has shown at Capitain Petzel, Berlin (2019); LC Queisser, Tbilisi (2019); Sammlung Philara, Düsseldorf (2019); Mary Boone Gallery, New York (2018); Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London (2017) among others. She has participated in numerous group shows including at the Deichtorhallen, Hamburg (2020); Saatchi Gallery, London (2018); Tanya Leighton, Berlin (2017); Good Press, Glasgow (2016); basis, Frankfurt (2015). Heinze’s works are in the collections of the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden and the Marguerite Hoffman Collection, Dallas.

Pieter Schoolwerth

Shifted Sims

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 3, 2020 - October 31, 2020
The hidden cost of 21st-century convenience is that you are stalked by a muzzy dread, a feeling that everything you do inflicts some distant unseen harm. The extraordinary events of 2020 sharpen focus on the disastrous and racialized consequences of this estrangement. In Shifted Sims, his first solo exhibition at Petzel Gallery in New York, Schoolwerth gives form to the condition of being “remote” and retreating into masks—from the N95 to the quarantine selfie. What’s more, he pressures painting to catch up to the surge of online profiles, identities without bodies, that teem at the surface of this “once-removed” existence. Schoolwerth’s psychoactive tableaus depict CGI avatars let loose in the digital froth: a Baywatch-y beach, a fashion-brand showroom, a furry orgy. He pulls these scenes from screenshots of The Sims 4, the strategic life-simulation computer game where anything goes—or does it? Trailing every avatar is an estranged silhouetted double, snapped into existence by the “shift” of Shifted Sims. Each composition has been superimposed, askew, over the photograph of a handmade 3D relief sculpture of the image. What appears is a shadow realm of vestigial matter, yanked into view on inkjet-printed canvases and parceled in paint. It is a taut braid of formal practice and allegory, one that questions painting’s viability in the age of the internet. In the 2019 monograph Model as Painting, he delineates how these “forces of abstraction” conceal labor and infrastructure under a late-capitalist mirage of frictionless, disembodied connectivity. This schism plunges down to the scale of the individual, pitting avatar protagonist against human penumbra. Western painting tradition, with its claims to authenticity and representation, is pulled into this Thunderdome of online subject-formation. The works in Shifted Sims question expressionism’s historical claims to transcendent interiority. Schoolwerth renders the Sims’ faces with striking impasto marks that “expressionize the avatar,” humanizing these subjects through visibly manual, painterly gestures. But these subjective punctures of the digital network may be fleeting. Appearing on the canvas next to perfectly raked furrows of paint—Schoolwerth’s proxy for repressed physical infrastructure—expressionism becomes one style among many, attenuating its status as exalted painterly communiqué. You’re left with the dark thought that De Kooning’s Woman would make a pretty good Snapchat filter. Scrambling to address the malaise of social distance, a startup recently launched voice-controlled avatars for video meetings, a real-time Sim who wears pants so you don’t have to. Schoolwerth’s paintings of (often pants-less) avatars counter these riptides of isolation, approximating a shared affective experience of the present moment: the monumental, and the berserk. —Lucy Hunter

 
Past Exhibitions

Nicola Tyson

Sense of Self

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

September 2, 2020 - October 3, 2020
Petzel Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition of recent paintings by British-born artist Nicola Tyson. On view from September 2 to October 3, the show marks the second exhibition on the parlor floor of Petzel’s newly expanded Upper East Side gallery, located at 35 East 67th Street. This is Tyson’s tenth solo exhibition with Petzel, and her first show in New York since 2016. Known primarily as a painter, Nicola Tyson has been working for over 30 years across a range of media including painting, photography, film, performance, and the written word. In the new paintings on view this fall, we encounter figures that relay a gender-fluidity typical of Tyson’s work, but now with a more emotional twist. These new large-scale paintings were conceived and begun before New York’s lockdown due to COVID-19. Tyson temporarily abandoned the body of the work amidst the pandemic, and then returned to complete them over the summer months. As Tyson put it, “When the world suddenly stopped and the familiar cultural coordinates fell away — and with it ‘the argument’ — I was unnerved and found it difficult to paint.” Instead she turned to drawing, producing almost daily original graphite on paper works, and exhibiting over 50 of them on Petzel’s online exhibition platform, alongside time-lapse video footage documenting her drawing process. “The figures in Nicola Tyson’s drawings often seem haunted: elongated bodies, faces composed of blocky shapes filled in with dense pencil marks,” Jillian Steinhauer of The New York Times recently wrote when singling out her Instagram account as one to follow during these peculiar times. Upon returning to the paintings over the summer, Tyson found that the center of gravity had shifted. What had begun as an exploration of relationship to another, refocused instead on relationship with self. Familiar territory for Tyson who has deployed methods of self-portraiture since the beginning of her career — exploring the inherent strangeness of our fictional self, the me, and the I, that is nevertheless one’s ‘home’. Tyson’s self-portraits are always easily identified by the red hair, “something that singled me out as ‘odd’ growing up,” she explained. For Tyson, as for the Austrian master of self-portraiture, Maria Lassnig — humor and self-mockery are key. “Body awareness painting,” as Lassnig coined it, is the process of painting not how the body looks externally, but rather how it feels internally. Be it an emotion, human experience, gesture, or physical function, what exactly does it mean to be in a body and how can the experience be captured? Akin to this, Tyson notes that she is now interested in, “the self-portrait not as alienated self-examination, but as humorous proposition,” an investigation that is made central in this exhibition consisting of four giant, and at times absurd and somewhat inscrutable self-portraits – such as Big Yellow Self-Portrait and Self Portrait: Stripes (both 2020). “What is creative authority anyway” Tyson asks, “and who has it and why?” Additionally on view, are two large canvases which describe the struggle for connection with one another: Two One and Two Two (both 2020), and four explosive small canvases, Bouquets 1–4 (all 2020), in which the figure dissolves and reconstructs into four lively bouquets. ‘Sense’ here, refers to Tyson’s intuitive approach to image-making. As in her graphite drawings, the title and the explanation always come after the fact. The paintings begin life as drawings and the meaning emerges in the act of making the images. This is how her signature technique takes form.

Danica Barboza, Genesis Belanger, Meriem Bennani, Sascha Braunig, Florencia Escudero, Hadi Fallahpisheh, Anna Glantz, Ivy Haldeman, Christina Quarles, Emily Mae Smith, and Greg Parma Smith

A Love Letter to a Nightmare

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

July 15, 2020 - August 14, 2020
The skeleton was as happy as a madman whose straitjacket had been taken off. He felt liberated at being able to walk without flesh. The mosquitoes didn’t bite him anymore. He didn’t have to have his hair cut. He was neither hungry nor thirsty, hot nor cold. He was far from the lizard of love. – Leonora Carrington, The Seventh Horse and Other Tales As we reopen, Petzel Gallery is pleased to present A Love Letter to a Nightmare, a summer group exhibition that will be on view from July 15 – August 14 at the gallery’s Chelsea location. The exhibition’s premise is to take into consideration contemporary visual modes and expressions that trace back to historical movements such as Surrealism, Symbolism and Pop, through the lens of our current uncertain existence. Call it vamped Surrealism and Symbolism. The show ponders how the aesthetic of modern surrealism/symbolism has been dressed up and added upon, sexualized, feminized, and reworked in the 21st Century. How does the state of a bound subconscious affect these artworks? This has become especially prevalent while the world shelters from the coronavirus pandemic and confronts centuries of inequity in a moment of historic unrest and great potential for revolutionary change. Beneath our daily struggle for normalcy bubbles a shared unconscious anxiety, fear, loneliness, despair, and trepidation of the future. In these times, the fabric of society is now both flattened into two dimensions as we socialize through screens – from our Zoom meetings, family check-ins, and “cocktails with friends,” to the daily State and Federal news conferences, Instagram stories, and Tik Tok videos – and yet simultaneously burst open in valiant action both intellectual and physical as we gather, protest, and organize in efforts to reimagine and rebuild a more just world. Our dreams have become more “vivid” and “menacing,” according to The New York Times, and, of course, in fantasy there is room for radical possibility. How might these practices of contemporary Surrealism, Symbolism and Pop, be read and implemented in reaction to the current upheaval? As one of the artists offered – how might these daydreams and nightmares be used as “forms of resistance, or in addressing trauma, enfranchising the masses, and envisioning necessary escape?” The exhibition asks how does each artist’s subjective work – painting, sculpture, installation, and video – explain a world riddled with multiple “objective” truths? A Love Letter to a Nightmare includes work by Danica Barboza, Genesis Belanger, Meriem Bennani, Sascha Braunig, Florencia Escudero, Hadi Fallahpisheh, Anna Glantz, Ivy Haldeman, Christina Quarles, Emily Mae Smith, and Greg Parma Smith. Petzel Gallery thanks all the participating artists and their galleries for their collaboration: C L E A R I N G, Downs & Ross, David Lewis, LOMEX, Kristen Lorello, Perrotin, Regen Projects, and Simone Subal Gallery. Image: Sascha Braunig, Deep V, 2019, Oil on linen over panel, 60 x 38 inches.

Private View

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

March 5, 2020 - May 31, 2020
Petzel presents “Private View,” a special exhibition of works by gallery artists. The show, on view at 35 East 67th Street, Third Floor, includes works by Ross Bleckner, Cosima von Bonin, Keith Edmier, Derek Fordjour, Wade Guyton, Charline von Heyl, Sean Landers, Maria Lassnig, Jorge Pardo, Seth Price, Jon Pylypchuk, Dana Schutz, Nicola Tyson, Corinne Wasmuht, and Heimo Zobernig.

Hiroki Tsukuda

They Live

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

March 5, 2020 - June 8, 2020
Petzel Gallery is pleased to present They Live, a solo exhibition of new works by Hiroki Tsukuda. The show will be on view from March 5 to April 18, 2020 and marks Tsukuda’s second exhibition at the gallery’s Chelsea location. An opening reception with the artist will be held on Thursday, March 5th, from 6–8pm. In reference to John Carpenter’s 1988 cult classic film with the same name, They Live presents a dystopian reality whereby current society has become surreptitiously controlled by humanoid extraterrestrials. Enamored by sci-fi since early childhood, Tsukuda has drawn inspiration from dystopic thrillers, apocalyptic novels, and cyberpunk manga. These fictions have percolated into the artist’s consciousness, transforming his ideas and artistic practice. Working in the realms of drawing and digital collage, Tsukuda creates multi-dimensional pictures by compositing a profusion of found and created images and coding them with computerized characters and cryptic hieroglyphics. The resulting images appear in states of controlled chaos and organic mutation, edging on a pictorial language that merges cyberpunk fantasy and real-life space exploration. Some of these abstractions hang off of large hollow wooden enclosures while a set of four bionic figures suspend from vacant steel-pipe scaffolds. Rocks, driftwood, and other organic materials are presented on wooden shelves alongside these cybernetic environments. This exhibition also features work that combines photographs and improvisational drawings, and engages with a new technique in which geometries and cartographic representations are rendered onto acrylic frames through silkscreen printing. Hiroki Tsukuda was born in Kagawa, Japan in 1978, and graduated from the Department of Imaging Arts & Sciences at Musashino Art University. In recent years he has received increasing international acclaim with numerous solo exhibitions including Monolog in the Doom, Museum of Modern Art, Gunma, 2019; 199X Storm Garden, Capitain Petzel, Berlin, 2019; 199X, Nanzuka, Tokyo, 2018; Hour of Excavation, Neuer Aachener Kunstverein, Aachen, Germany, 2017; Hiroki Tsukuda, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne, Germany, 2017. A largescale work was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art, New York. His work is included in private and public collections worldwide.

Rodney McMillian

Recirculating Goods

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

February 27, 2020 - July 31, 2020

Walead Beshty

Abstract of A Partial Disassembling of an Invention Without a Future: Helter-Skelter and Random Notes in Which the Pulleys and Cogwheels Are Lying Around at Random All Over the Workbench

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

October 24, 2019 - December 14, 2019

Wade Guyton and Stephen Prina

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 12, 2019 - October 5, 2019

Stephen Prina

English for Foreigners (abridged)

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

September 11, 2019 - October 26, 2019

Dana Hoey

Dana Hoey Presents

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

June 27, 2019 - August 2, 2019

Andachtsbild: Curated by Karel Schampers

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

May 3, 2019 - June 22, 2019

Ross Bleckner

Pharmaceutria

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

April 24, 2019 - June 15, 2019

Strategic Vandalism: The Legacy of Asger Jorn’s Modification Paintings

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

March 5, 2019 - April 13, 2019

Jorge Pardo

Eccentric Reflexivity 1988–1994

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

February 28, 2019 - April 27, 2019

Adam McEwen

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

January 22, 2019 - February 16, 2019

Dana Schutz

Imagine Me and You

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

January 10, 2019 - February 23, 2019

Seth Price

Hell Has Everything

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

November 8, 2018 - January 5, 2019

Sarah Morris

Midtown Paintings: 1998–2001

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

November 1, 2018 - January 5, 2019

Wade Guyton and Stephen Prina

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

October 26, 2018 - October 27, 2018

Painting: Martin Kippenberger, Maria Lassnig, Albert Oehlen, Dana Schutz

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

September 12, 2018 - November 3, 2018

Seth Price

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 8, 2018 - January 5, 2019

Charline von Heyl

New Work

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 6, 2018 - October 20, 2018

Haroshi, Makoto Taniguchi, Masato Mori

Condo New York: Nanzuka at Petzel

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

June 29, 2018 - July 27, 2018

Christian Jankowski

2017

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

June 28, 2018 - August 3, 2018

Wade Guyton

Patagonia

456 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

May 4, 2018 - June 16, 2018

Dirk Skreber

days before

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

May 2, 2018 - June 23, 2018

Sean Landers

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

March 1, 2018 - April 21, 2018

Heimo Zobernig

nework

35 East 67th Street, Parlor & 3rd Floors
New York, NY 10065

January 18, 2018 - February 17, 2018