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515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011
212 206 9300

Also at:
530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011
212 206 7606

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065
212 753 2200
Artists Represented:
Ricci Albenda
Richard Aldrich
Allora & Calzadilla
Kai Althoff
Miroslaw Balka
Matthew Barney
Robert Bechtle
Alighiero Boetti
Kasper Bosmans
Ian Cheng
Anne Collier
Claudia Comte
Carroll Dunham
Cecilia Edefalk
Roe Ethridge
Cyprien Gaillard
Maureen Gallace
Guo Fengyi
Keith Haring
Thomas Hirschhorn
Jim Hodges
Huang Yong Ping
Cameron Jamie
Birgit Jürgenssen
Pierre Klossowski
Sharon Lockhart
Andrew Lord
Sarah Lucas
Victor Man
Robert Mapplethorpe
Fausto Melotti
Mario Merz
Marisa Merz
Wangechi Mutu
Jean-Luc Mylayne
Shirin Neshat
Damián Ortega
Philippe Parreno
Elizabeth Peyton
Walter Pichler
Richard Prince
R. H. Quaytman
Ugo Rondinone
Mimmo Rotella
Gedi Sibony
Amy Sillman
Jack Smith Archive
Vivian Suter
Walter Swennen
Rosemarie Trockel
Banks Violette
Alfredo Volpi
Paloma Varga Weisz
Andro Wekua
T. J. Wilcox
Michael Williams
Anicka Yi
Works Available By:


 
Current Exhibitions

T.J. Wilcox

Spectrum

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

January 18, 2020 - February 22, 2020
Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present Spectrum, an exhibition of new works by T. J. Wilcox. For this show, Wilcox debuts a six-part silent film based on different colors of the rainbow. In its installation, each hue blends together and elaborates a figure or event that has been seminal to the artist’s experience in becoming an artist and as a gay man. The works in this show explore the artist’s maturation and identity in ways that are both deeply personal and universal. Alongside the film, Wilcox presents a series of new photocollages on silk based on the video works that comprise Spectrum, adding this new material to his expanding practice. The elliptical narratives from Spectrum transform a series of visual fragments into dissected fractions of light that delve into a variety of topics significant to Wilcox’s identity and research interests. Drawing from a range of cultural sources, from documentary to mythic, the single projection film investigates Wilcox’s cathexis towards objects of popular fixation and their significance in the formation of the artist’s queer identity. With Hyacinth and Apollo and Taglioni’s Dance, Wilcox references figures engaged in the act of preservation, of cultivating their own legends. Both Apollo’s invention of the hyacinth to memorialize his lover and prima ballerina La Taglioni’s habitual reenactment of her starlit dance over the snow parallel Wilcox’s process of reconstructing a memory through the use of emblematic imagery. In the works that derive from documentary sources, Garden in Hell, Grapefruit, and Green Carnation, Wilcox similarly manipulates significant anecdotes—gathering archival footage of Vogue editrix Diana Vreeland’s red living room, meditating on green carnations as a stand-in for Oscar Wilde’s flamboyant persona and as a reference to his prosecution for gross indecency, or Yoko Ono’s book of life instructions—in order to deconstruct the process by which history is distilled from embodied living experiences. Often, Wilcox’s evocative images hold queer double-meanings, and the same holds true in Monarch Butterfly which follows the eponymous creature, commonly associated with gay men and thought of as delicate and frivolous, as it completes one of the most complex migratory events in the natural world, traveling over 8,000 miles on its paper-thin wings. Exhibited simultaneously as looped videos that are projected onto a long, narrow screen, each film has differing durations. The resulting projection creates a seemingly never-ending viewing experience within the structurally complex exhibition space Wilcox has constructed. The narratives and colors bleed into one another, creating an optically compelling story that can be read or experienced as six different films or a single image. This complexity and careful attention to creating an immersive environment is further demonstrated through the monumental scale of the single screen and the cascading rainbow that appears beneath the projection, continuing to envelop the viewer into a space that is both vibrant and contemplative. Alongside each film, Wilcox has made a series of multi-ply silk hangings, printed with a photo-collaged images that references the source materials from each new video work. The collages borrow from documentary sources, Wilcox’s own photography, illustrations, and found imagery to construct portraits of the historical subjects or natural world. Recalling both the omnipresent flag of queer liberation and the importance of the color spectrum in the optics of film and photography, Wilcox’s hanging photographs explore both process and history with a subtle biographical edge. T. J. Wilcox was born in 1965 in Seattle, Washington, and lives and works in New York. His work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at institutions including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Grand Rapids Art Museum, Michigan; Carthage Hall, Lismore Castle Arts, Waterford, Ireland; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and Kunstverein Munich, Munich. Wilcox has been included in group exhibitions at institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Musee d’art et d’histoire, Geneva; Centro Galego De Arte Contemporánea, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, Germany; Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany. His films have been screened at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Tate Modern, London, and he participated in the 2015 Biennale de Lyon and the 2004 Whitney Biennial.

Salvo

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

January 11, 2020 - February 29, 2020
Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings by Salvo (1947 – 2015). Focusing on the artist’s compositions of landscapes and cities, this show surveys more than 30 years of Salvo’s artistic practice and highlights his early conceptual art and his astounding aptitude for portraying the complexities of light and the passage of time. Organized in collaboration with Archivio Salvo, the works in this show solidify Salvo’s singular and ever explorative approach to artmaking and his lasting impact on Italian modernism. Salvo, whose given name was Salvatore Mangione, was born in Leonforte, Sicily, in 1947. After permanently relocating to his adoptive city of Turin in 1968, he quickly became involved in the blossoming Arte Povera movement, which was born as a response to the social and political unrest in Italy throughout the 1960s. During this period, Salvo shared a studio with Alighiero Boetti, one of the pioneers of this radical movement. Salvo and Boetti had an ongoing relationship and reciprocally collaborative influence on each other’s practices; the combination of influences from Boetti and other artists of the time impacted Salvo’s own artmaking and understanding of the world around him. At this early stage in his career, Salvo employed conceptual strategies to meditate on the nature of artistic practice, and the role of the artist as both a preternaturally talented individual and a conduit to the past and the history of culture. An example of works from this period include a series of “self-portraits” - altered or staged photographs that depicted him as a baker, bartender, guerilla, saint, and the painter Raphael. By 1973, Salvo pivoted away from conceptual work and began to explore the radical and complex possibilities inherent to figurative painting. The impulse Salvo felt to transform the nature of his work culminated in a powerful visual shift that preoccupied him for decades and resulted in a series of paintings with incredible depth, consistency, and nuance. Salvo’s rebuttal to the monochrome aesthetic in the hyper-saturated, imagined landscapes and cityscapes he began to depict made him an artistic outlier until the international resurgence of painting in the 1980s. The works in this exhibition, painted between 1980 and 2011, harken back to avant-garde predecessors like Giorgio de Chirico and Carlo Carrà in distilling real, imagined, and remembered spaces into a profound meditation on the passage of time. The pastoral scenes and quaint villages Salvo portrays are created with a vibrant palette of oil paints and reference architectural motifs and plant species native to the cities where he lived and worked. Unlike de Chirico and Carrà’s visual response to industrialization and modernism, Salvo’s paintings focus more specifically on complex psychological narratives and abstract concepts like time. This ability to translate the passage of time through his incisive approach to capturing differing lighting situations is further demonstrated by the titles of Salvo’s paintings; many of the works on view are named after seasons, months, or times of day. The multifaceted body of work Salvo left behind solidifies his crucial place in the history of art and lasting influence on modern and contemporary artists alike. Concurrent to the exhibition, Gladstone will reprint Salvo: Della Pittura / On Painting / Über die Malerei (Buchhandlung Walther König), the publication from the gallery’s first exhibition with the artist in 1986. Salvo was born Salvatore Mangione in Leonforte, Sicily, in 1947 and lived and worked primarily in Turin until his death in 2015. Solo presentations of his work include the Museum Folkwang, Essen (1977); Mannheimer Kunstverein (1977); Kunstmuseum Lucerne (1983); Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1988); Musée d’Art Contemporain, Nîmes (1988); Villa delle Rose, Bologna (1998); Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Bergamo (2002); Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Turin (2007); Museo d’Arte della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano, with Alighiero Boetti (2017). He also participated in Documenta 5 (1972) and the 1976 and 1988 editions of the Venice Biennale.

 
Past Exhibitions

Ugo Rondinone

thanx 4 nothing (A Tribute to John Giorno)

530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

November 23, 2019 - January 18, 2020
Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present Ugo Rondinone’s thanx 4 nothing, a mutli-channel video installation that pays tribute to the artist’s late husband, John Giorno. Rondinone reconstructs the gallery into a black box theater, creating an immersive environment through the use of black-and-white film, minimalist score, and the rhythmic intonations of Giorno’s own voice. This exhibition is a prismatic paean to the poet, raconteur, muse, cultural icon, and New York fixture. Curator Ralph Rugoff said of the work on the occasion of its installation at Hayward Gallery in 2016: In elegantly spectacular fashion, Ugo Rondinone’s 20-screen video installation, thanx 4 nothing (2015), presents the American poet John Giorno reciting – though ‘performing’ might be a better word – the titular poem. Written on his seventieth birthday in 2006, and framed as an extended and wide-ranging expression of gratitude to ‘everyone for everything,’ Giorno’s poetic monologue looks back over his life with frank insight and humour, reflecting on loves and losses, friends and enemies, sex and drugs, depression and spiritual acceptance. As presented by Rondinone, whose work inventively interlaces the rhythms of his images with those of the poet’s speech, it is also a dizzying meditation on duality. Ugo Rondinone was born in 1964 in Brunnen, Switzerland and lives and works in New York. Since 2013 Rondinone has been the subject of solo exhibitions at institutions including: Kunsthalle Helsinki; Tate Liverpool; ARKEN Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen; Bass Museum of Art, Miami; Château de Versailles; Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow; Place Vendôme, Paris; MACRO and Mercati di Traiano, Rome; Carré D’Art, Nimes; Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam; Palais De Tokyo, Paris; Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney; Secession, Vienna; Anahuacalli Museum, Mexico City; Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai; Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens; Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien; Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle, Belgium; M – Museum Leuven, Belgium; Public Art Fund, Rockefeller Center; New York and Art Institute of Chicago. In 2016, Rondinone’s large-scale public work “seven magic mountains” opened outside Las Vegas, co-produced by the Art Production Fund and Nevada Museum of Art. In 2017, Rondinone curated a city-wide exhibition, “Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno,” which honored the artist’s life partner in thirteen non-profit art institutions throughout Manhattan.

Andro Wekua

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

November 1, 2019 - December 21, 2019
Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Andro Wekua. Known for the multidisciplinary nature of his practice, Wekua has created a series of paintings and sculptures that continue his career-long exploration of the liminal space between objectivity and subjective interpretation. In works that are redolent with the artifacts of an ambiguous and undefined history, Wekua presents a series of tableaux that reveal themselves to us as emotionally familiar in spite of the artist’s gestures of obfuscation and his conscious disavowal of the formal tropes of narrative. Using collage and assemblage as metaphors for the cognitive machinations that transform lived experience into reflection, the exhibition features a group of paintings that redeploy imagery recurrent throughout Wekua’s oeuvre. Silkscreened onto aluminum and subsequently overpainted—often gilded with silver leaf—images of palm fronds, photographic portraits, dolphins, and sections of wrought iron fence present themselves as sites of contemplation analogous to traditional icons. The artist’s continual reconfiguration of the images that define his visual lexicon indicates a compulsion to reorder the past in a search for alternative outcomes, in spite of the futility of ever finding satisfaction. Central to the exhibition are two new bronze sculptures. The body of an androgynous child peering out from behind a palm leaf and a dolphin mimics the accretion of imagery that develop Wekua’s paintings and collages. However, its figurative relations do not liberate it from the realm of narrative inconclusion. Featureless and undefined, the figure instead remains a floating signifier suspended in anamnesis. A second sculpture of Eros encircled by a dolphin furthers the conceptual underpinnings of the exhibition. Though the object reiterates two themes found throughout the artist’s oeuvre, it was inspired by a second century sculpture located at the Farnese Collection in Naples. While Wekua presents a near duplication of the original, he alters significant details through acts of concealment and deletion. By removing Eros’s mouth and feet, Wekua directly addresses the failures inherent to the concept of the copy. Both figures’ have also been fitted with highly realistic and expressive milled glass eyes, a detail that reflects the viewer’s desire to fill in the information that Wekua withholds while simultaneously imbuing uncanny liveliness on an otherwise emphatically inanimate object. Andro Wekua was born in 1977 in Georgia, and studied visual arts there and in Basel, Switzerland. Recent solo museum exhibitions include Kunsthalle Zürich, Switzerland; Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow; Kölnischer Kunstverein, Germany; Kunsthalle Wien, Austria; Kunsthalle Fridericianum, Kassel, Germany; Castello di Rivoli, Turin, Italy; Wiels, Brussels; Neue Kunst Halle, St. Gallen, Switzerland; Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Switzerland; Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Camden Arts Center, London; the De Haalen Haarlem, Netherlands; Le Magasin, Grenoble, France; and the Benaki Museum, Athens. He has participated in various group shows including “ILLUMInations” at the 54th Venice Biennale (2011); “Contemplating the Void” at the Guggenheim Museum in New York (2010); “10,000 Lives,” 8th Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2010); “Life on Mars: 55th Carnegie International,” Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, and the 4th Berlin Biennial (2006).

Matthew Barney

Embrasure

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

October 26, 2019 - December 1, 2019
Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present Embrasure, an exhibition of new drawings, etchings, and sculpture by Matthew Barney. The works in Embrasure draw from the narratives, processes, and imagery introduced in Barney’s latest project Redoubt, while expanding on its allegorical and cosmological themes. Barney’s 2018 film Redoubt is set on a wolf hunt in Idaho’s rugged Sawtooth Mountains, continuing the artist’s long-standing preoccupation with landscape as both setting and subject. Redoubt adopts the ancient myth of Diana, goddess of the hunt, and Actaeon, a hunter who trespasses on her, as its narrative framework. In Redoubt, an Engraver, played by Barney, creates a series of plein-air drawings on copper plates as he stalks Diana and her attendants. An Electroplater in a remote laboratory subjects them to a chemical process that transforms the Engraver’s drawings: each plate is immersed in an electroplating solution, causing copper growths to form on the engraved lines. Her actions, undertaken with a ritualistic focus, transform the engravings into talismanic objects, connecting them to Barney’s work in drawing, sculpting, and performance. The drawings in Embrasure, made with graphite and charcoal in the artist’s richly colored plastic frames, take the characters, sites, and iconography of Redoubt as points of departure into a world more ominous and strange. In these intricate drawings, Diana is rendered as a fierce deity, replete with tactical gear; Actaeon, whose mythical death is only a subtext in Redoubt, is here fully transformed and impaled on a burnt tree. Ornate fortresses of war allude to the military architecture that inspired this new project and its title; elevation maps are abstracted into feverish patterns. Barney’s fascination with the topography of Idaho is equaled here by a fixation on the celestial landscape, as the Lupus constellation – the wolf – appears in several drawings. In Embrasure, Barney also debuts a series of etchings that combine traditional printmaking processes with the electroplating technique developed in Redoubt. In this case, a network of copper is propagated through minute pores in the paper etchings, creating nodules that partially obscure the engraved lines. In addition to the works on paper, Barney presents a new sculpture, which he made with a tree harvested from a forest fire area in the Sawtooth Mountains. The work was made by pouring molten brass and copper into a hollowed-out recess in the tree, creating a unique cast that layers the two metals in an unrepeatable organic form. Concurrent to the exhibition at Gladstone, New York’s Film Forum will host the theatrical release of Redoubt, which will play from October 30 through November 12, 2019. In early 2020, Landmark's Nuart Theatre will host the Los Angeles premiere of the film, followed by additional screenings around the country to be announced soon. Matthew Barney was born in San Francisco in 1967 and lives and works in New York. Barney’s most recent project, Redoubt, premiered at the Yale University Art Gallery on March 1, 2019, and is currently on view at the UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing, China through January 12, 2020. Additional one-person exhibitions include: THE CREMASTER CYCLE, organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York and traveled to Museum Ludwig, Cologne and Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; DRAWING RESTRAINT, organized by the 21st Century Museum for Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan and traveled to Leeum Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Serpentine Gallery, London; and Kunsthalle Vienna; and RIVER OF FUNDAMENT, organized by Haus der Kunst, Munich and traveled to The Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Barney has received numerous awards including the Aperto prize at the 1993 Venice Biennale; the Hugo Boss Award in 1996; the 2007 Kaiser Ring Award in Goslar, Germany and the San Francisco International Film Festival’s Persistence of Vision Award in 2011.

Maureen Gallace

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

September 21, 2019 - October 19, 2019

Walter Swennen

Leavin home but there is no home at all

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 18, 2019 - October 19, 2019

Allora & Calzadilla

Cadastre

530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

September 13, 2019 - November 2, 2019

Dry Land

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

June 24, 2019 - July 26, 2019

Abstract, Representational, and so forth

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

June 20, 2019 - July 26, 2019

Damián Ortega

Porous Structures

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

May 1, 2019 - June 8, 2019

Lina Bo Bardi & Giancarlo Palanti

Studio d'Arte Palma

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

April 27, 2019 - June 15, 2019

Vivian Suter

530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

April 11, 2019 - June 8, 2019

Philippe Parreno

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

March 6, 2019 - April 13, 2019

Ian Cheng

BOB

530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

January 31, 2019 - March 23, 2019

Paloma Varga Weisz

Wundergestalt

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

January 12, 2019 - February 16, 2019

Claudia Comte

The Morphing Scallops

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

January 11, 2019 - February 16, 2019

Keith Haring

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

November 3, 2018 - December 21, 2018

Victor Man

Flowering Ego

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

November 1, 2018 - December 22, 2018

Ugo Rondinone

drifting clouds

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 22, 2018 - November 3, 2018

Ugo Rondinone

drifting clouds

530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

September 22, 2018 - November 3, 2018

Banks Violette

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

September 15, 2018 - October 27, 2018

Vito Acconci, Paul Chan, Sharon Hayes, Barbara Kruger, and Rirkrit Tiravanija

Voice of America

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

June 29, 2018 - July 27, 2018

SAFE

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

June 28, 2018 - July 27, 2018

Andrew Lord

unslumbrous night

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

May 11, 2018 - June 16, 2018

Huang Yong Ping

530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

April 28, 2018 - June 9, 2018

Carroll Dunham

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

April 20, 2018 - June 16, 2018

Robert Bechtle

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

March 10, 2018 - April 21, 2018

Robert Mapplethorpe

Robert Mapplethorpe: Curated by Roe Ethridge

515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

March 3, 2018 - April 14, 2018

Cyprien Gaillard

Nightlife

530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

February 23, 2018 - April 21, 2018

Amy Sillman

Mostly Drawing

130 East 64th Street
New York, NY 10065

January 26, 2018 - March 3, 2018