260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
415 495 5454



Artists Represented:
John Andrews
Chris Ballantyne
Rina Banerjee
Jim Campbell
Julie Chang
Russell Crotty
Reed Danziger
Jay DeFeo
Anoka Faruqee
Luka Fineisen
Jutta Haeckel
Tim Hawkinson
Christian Houge
Alfredo Jaar
Stefan Kürten
Michael Light
Crystal Liu
Bernard Lokai
Emil Lukas
Marco Maggi
Ben McLaughlin
John O'Reilly
Driss Ouadahi
Patricia Piccinini
Nicole Phungrasamee Fein
Liliana Porter
Angelina Pwerle
Alan Rath
Lordy Rodriguez
Gideon Rubin
Surabhi Saraf
Andrew Schoultz
Cornelius Völker
William T. Wiley

 
Current Exhibitions

Jutta Haeckel
Future Echo
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

March 11, 2017 - April 29, 2017
Düsseldorf-based painter Jutta Haeckel has accomplished a rare feat in the crowded arena of contemporary art — she has developed a style of painting that is unique. In her fifth exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery, she uses her technical breakthrough to express the uncertainty of our time. Haeckel creates multiple viewpoints within a single painting by treating three-dimensional representation within a picture plane as fluid. Her technique reverses traditional processes of depiction: instead of drawing a line to define the outline of a form, she delineates a shape by painting the negative space around it, inverting one’s perception of foreground and background. The effect is, as erstwhile critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, Kenneth Baker, described it, a “dreamlike quality of one image or plane of awareness bleeding or burning through another, a sensation available only to memory, seldom approximated in any pictorial art.” Haeckel believes we exist in a time of increasingly rapid change and instability. Populations are finding conventional patterns, structures, codes and rules no longer reliable. She uses ambiguity — of space, perspective and perception — as a metaphor to describe that flux, and the necessity to think elastically. Jutta Haeckel was born in Hannover, Germany in 1972. She studied at Hochschule für Künste, Bremen, Germany and Goldsmiths College, London, England. She has exhibited widely in Germany, including recent exhibitions at the Kunsthalle in Recklinghausen and at Schloss Detmold. This is her fifth solo exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery.

Marco Maggi
Global Myopia (Language in Residence)
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

March 11, 2017 - April 29, 2017
Hosfelt Gallery is pleased to present the West Coast premiere of Marco Maggi’s first video installation. The two-channel, 30-minute video installation draws its content from Maggi’s 2015 Venice Biennale exhibition in the Uruguay pavilion. Maggi’s video venerates and satirizes the complexities and paradoxes of the experience of contemporary art from the viewpoint of a spectator observing spectators. In all of Maggi’s work, the necessity of slowing down, moving in closely, and examining carefully are requisites to encountering the intricacies of his techniques and ideas. In Maggi’s view, myopia has a positive connotation: narrowing one’s vision to focus, pay attention, and contemplate. It becomes an act of rebellion in a world of incessant distraction, where the speed and quantity of information is instantaneous, omnipresent, and overwhelming. Born in Montevideo, Uruguay in 1957, Marco Maggi now divides his time between New Paltz, NY and Montevideo. He was chosen to represent Uruguay in the 2015 Venice Biennale. His work is in numerous museum collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; as well as in the Cisneros Collection, New York and the Daros Foundation, Zurich.

 
Past Exhibitions

Rina Banerjee
Human Likeness
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

January 28, 2017 - March 4, 2017
Kolkata-born and New York-based, Rina Banerjee fills the entire gallery with her fantastical, immoderate sculptures and delicately swirling paintings in an exhibition that seeks to describe the human experience in an era of unprecedented migration and interconnectedness. Banerjee’s sculptures are shamanistic assemblages of textiles, feathers, sparkling glass and tinkling bells. Beaded, embroidered and sensuously monstrous, they wantonly conjoin the exotic and rare with the cheap and mass-produced — rejecting conventional hierarchies of material and culture. In her paintings, chimeric female forms dance and float through vibrant, bountiful landscapes in states of hybrid transformation. In a post-colonial, global world, identity — racial, cultural or gender — is no longer easily defined. In this exhibition, Banerjee offers up the optimistic possibility of a world freed from the constraints of conventional standards of beauty, worth, social pecking order and what is “proper.” We live in a moment of singular opportunity, Banerjee posits, a moment when it is possible for individuals to define themselves in a way that is truly authentic. Rina Banerjee (b. 1963, Kolkata, India) received a BS in Polymer Engineering and worked as a research chemist before completing her MFA at Yale in 1995. Recent solo museum exhibitions include the Smithsonian Museum’s Sackler Galleries (Washington DC) and the Musée Guimet (Paris). Her work was included in the 2000 Whitney Biennial, the 2005 and 2015 Greater New York Shows at PS1/MOMA, the 2013 Venice Biennale’s White Light/White Heat at the Glasstress Museum, the 2015 Asian Art Biennial at the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts (Taichung) and the 2016 Busan Biennial, South Korea. Her work will be included in this year’s Prospect 4 New Orleans Biennial. Her work is in the collections of the Devi Art Foundation (New Delhi), Kiran Nadar Museum (New Delhi), Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris), the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York), The Brooklyn Museum (New York), Berkeley Art Museum (Berkeley, CA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Hammer Museum (Los Angeles), and many others.

Crystal Liu
weighing it out
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

December 10, 2016 - January 21, 2017
Crystal Liu constructs landscapes that are metaphors for her emotional states. In large-scale paintings on paper that incorporate her adaptation of the technique of marbleized paper along with watercolor and metallic pigments, the fundamental elements of earth and sky enact narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope. There are echoes of the centuries-old tradition of Chinese ink brush painting in the swirls of marbleized black ink and the efficient distillation of line, form and color into evocative depictions of stone, mountain ranges, and subterranean cross-sections of earth. Metallic gold pigment provides a stark contrast in the form of a moon and hundreds of stars, which become the protagonists in an epic odyssey of faith and tenacity against the daunting forces of reality. Crystal Liu's parents emigrated from China to Toronto, Canada, where she was born in 1980. Liu majored in photography at the Ontario College of Art & Design and received an MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute in 2005. She resides in San Francisco.

Julie Chang
New Work
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

December 10, 2016 - January 21, 2017
Drawing from sources as diverse as African mudcloth, Japanese shibori, and Native American basket weavings, Julie Chang investigates how identities are constructed, engaging patterns to explore the personal and political forces that shape and misshape our lives. Chang will create a work directly on the walls and floor of the gallery as well as present a series of large-scale paintings on paper. The patterns in woven textiles and baskets reflect a rich multiplicity of traditions, while the elemental forms in each are common to many cultures across the globe. Similarly, the process of weaving embodies paradox in its unification of opposites: the warp and the weft, one vertical and one horizontal thread, one stretched taut and one in undulating motion. Taking her cue from the visual and technical components of weaving, Chang’s forms freely float and then gather and intertwine. Shapes migrate and cross boundaries, transformed by encounters with other forms. Arrivals, foreignness, dislocation, struggle and integration reference hidden histories both personal and universal. In many countries and cultures today, weaving remains a vital craft, reflecting vibrant traditions while encumbered by the politics of gender, race and class. Taking her identity as a Chinese American woman as a starting point, Chang explores the formal systems and invented structures in which we operate: rules, constraints, and possibilities made visible and material. Julie Chang was born in Parkridge, Illinois and raised in Orange County, California. She received her MFA from Stanford University in 2007. As one of five artists chosen to create a permanent art installation for the new San Francisco Transbay Transit Center, she is designing 20,000 square feet of terrazzo floor for the Grand Hall.

Liliana Porter
Actualidades / Breaking News
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

October 15, 2016 - November 23, 2016
Argentinian artist Liliana Porter is a master at distilling life and art to simple profundities through humorous juxtapositions of incongruous objects. For her first exhibition at the gallery in four years, Porter premieres a new video, Actualidades/Breaking News. In addition to the video, the exhibition showcases a full range of new work, including paintings, sculptural objects, installations, works on paper, and photographs, each challenging the proposition that time is linear and reality graspable. Over the years, Porter has amassed a prodigious and eccentric collection of figurines, knickknacks, toys, and souvenirs from her global travels. These kitschy objects appear regularly in her work, inviting political, philosophical, and existential interpretation through their arrangement in unexpected situations. Each tchotchke represents a different era and cultural/historical narrative. Porter delights in manipulating time, history and reality by combining them as though in dialogue in an atemporal white space. In her new video, titled Actualidades/Breaking News, Porter structures each scene as if it were a segment from a newscast or section in a newspaper, including “Arts and Leisure,” “Fashion and Style,” “World News,” and “Religion.” With music arranged and composed by Sylvia Meyer, each scenario becomes an evocative portrayal of the absurdities and tragedies perpetuated by poignant human surrogates in the form of shabby children’s toys, hilarious religious and political icons, and other peculiar and pathetic mass-produced objects. Liliana Porter was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1941. In 1961 she moved to New York, where she has lived and worked since. In 1965 she founded the New York Graphic Workshop with Luis Camnitzer and Jose Guillermo Castillo. Porter has shown extensively internationally, including most recently solo museum exhibitions at the Museo Caraffa, Cordoba, Argentina; Museo Nacional de Artes Visuales, Montevideo, Uruguay; MALBA, Buenos Aires; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museo Rayo, Roldanillo, Colombia; Centro Cultura de España, Santiago, Chile; and Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, as well as a two-person exhibition with Marcel Broodthaers at The New Museum, New York. Her work is in numerous public and private collections in Latin America, Europe and the United States, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain; Museo de Arte Moderno, Buenos Aires; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Smithsonian Museum of American Art; Daros-Latinoamerica Collection, Zurich; and Tate Modern, London.

25 artists, including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Patricia Piccinini, Tim Hawkinson, Liliana Porter, Andrew Schoultz, Hannah Wilke, Marco Maggi, Shahzia Sikander, Nick Cave, William T. Wiley, Jay DeFeo, Channing Hansen, Jim Campbell, and Ed Ruscha
20th Anniversary Exhibition
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

September 9, 2016 - October 8, 2016
Hosfelt Gallery celebrates its 20th anniversary with an exhibition exploring what makes an artwork significant and lasting, and the qualities that distinguish the most innovative artists of our era. This carefully curated selection of artists and works has been chosen to reflect the gallery’s distinct philosophical and aesthetic approach as well as the key values that have guided its program since inception. The exhibition features 25 artists, including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Patricia Piccinini, Tim Hawkinson, Liliana Porter, Andrew Schoultz, Hannah Wilke, Marco Maggi, Shahzia Sikander, Nick Cave, William T. Wiley, Jay DeFeo, Channing Hansen, Jim Campbell, and Ed Ruscha. Central to the gallery’s program are artists whose work is grounded in a deep understanding of history — be it artistic, literary, social, political or intellectual. Their originality derives from an idiosyncratic synthesis of that core knowledge with a mastery of their medium, resulting in artworks that allude to tradition while incorporating new materials, methods and ideas. From that informed viewpoint, they show us things we’ve never seen, challenge our preconceptions, and give us access to life experiences very different from our own. Art, at its best, can unveil the collective unconscious of a culture, and open a space for “the other” in our minds… and from a perspective broader than ourselves, inclusive of others, we can become co-creators of a new reality. About Hosfelt Gallery With a background in law, non-profit arts administration and collecting, Todd Hosfelt founded his gallery in 1996 in a 2,000 square foot space above the famed artist residency program, Capp Street Project, in San Francisco’s SOMA district. Former San Jose Museum of Art curator and current partner Dianne Dec joined the gallery in 1997. Over the years, the gallery developed a reputation for transforming gritty industrial buildings in off-the-beaten-path locations into extraordinary exhibition spaces, starting with its relocation in 1999 to a South of Market former warehouse. In 2006, Hosfelt Gallery opened a second venue in New York City, a few blocks north of Chelsea in Hell’s Kitchen, converting a derelict storeroom above an auto-body shop into 7,500 square feet of exquisite gallery space suffused in natural light. In 2012 the gallery consolidated its operations with a trailblazing move to its current location, establishing the nucleus of what is now San Francisco’s newest and most vibrant arts district, DoReMi. With 9,000 square feet of sky-lit space in a former door factory, the gallery’s integration of distinctive contemporary design with unaltered remnants of the building’s prior function mirrors its programmatic emphasis on innovative expression born out of a deep understanding of social, political, and/or cultural history. Over the course of twenty years, Hosfelt Gallery has distinguished itself through the introduction of exceptional new artists from around the world, the intellectual rigor of its programming, its role in nurturing the careers of now internationally-renowned artists, a commitment to showing work that may not align with current trends, and representation of some of the most important artists of the Bay Area. In 2015 the gallery founded the first Digital Media Conservation Lab to address the growing need for the preservation of digital and electronic art. Hosfelt Gallery is a member of the Art Dealers Association of America.

Driss Ouadahi
Breach in the Silence
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

July 16, 2016 - August 20, 2016
Algerian painter Driss Ouadahi studied architecture before immigrating to Germany, where he continues to live and work. Utilizing a vocabulary of architectural motifs, Ouadahi makes large-scale paintings that borrow from the history of modernist grid painting and traditional Islamic aesthetics, while tackling the difficult and timely topic of human migration. Ouadahi asks us to consider the political and psychological aspects of boundaries and the relationship they have to ethnicity and social class, through representations of three types of architectural imagery: cityscapes of glittering modernist high-rises, claustrophobic depictions of subway tunnels and photo-realistically rendered pictures of chain link fences. Perhaps in response to his volunteer work—helping refugees from conflicts in the Middle East resettle in Germany—imagery of the cyclone fence dominates Ouadahi’s most recent paintings. Fencing is a very real impediment to the movement of the millions of people currently fleeing war and violence or seeking a better life. It’s used to shut them out, pen them in and divide “them” from “us.” The fence is a dehumanizing symbol of “otherness”—a metaphor for alienation—as ugly a signifier as it is an object. Ouadahi’s depictions of the fence are meticulous. Delicately-rendered, woven-steel wire is drawn against the sky, simultaneously seductive and ominous. The fences sometimes stretch taught across the picture plane as an unbroken barrier, but more often are slashed open like a gaping wound or have the regularity of their grids bent out-of-shape, evidence that someone has torn through or scrambled up and over. These are images of struggle and irrepressibility… a message to those who call for the building of walls and the closing of borders. Driss Ouadahi was born in Morocco in 1959 to Algerian political exiles. He studied architecture in Algiers, and painting at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf, where he continues to live. He participated in the Cairo Biennial in 2010 and was included in The Future of a Promise: Contemporary Art from the Arab World during the 2011 Venice Biennale. He was awarded the grand prize at the Dakar Biennale in 2014. His work has been exhibited internationally, including in Dubai, New York, North Africa and throughout Europe. This is his fifth solo exhibition at Hosfelt Gallery. Hosfelt Gallery will present new paintings by Ouadahi, largely renderings of chain-link fences, that were influenced by the artist's interactions with Syrian and Iraqi refugees who have re-settled in Germany.

Patricia Piccinini
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

May 14, 2016 - July 9, 2016
Since she burst into international prominence at the 2003 Venice Biennale, Patricia Piccinini has become famous for creating some of the most troubling and provocative artworks of our time. With silicone, fiberglass, resin, human hair and animal fur, she imagines creatures that are eerie in their verisimilitude to flesh, but disconcertingly surreal. Her work makes us question what it means to be human, how that is rapidly changing through advances in medicine, science and technology, and how we might think differently to understand those changes. In her first solo exhibition on the West Coast, Piccinini will exhibit sculptures, drawings and a single channel video exploring possibilities of genetic variation and modification, the natural versus the unnatural, and love and parenthood. Piccinini raises questions about the most important topics of our time from a surreal perspective somewhere between thought and emotion -- but always from a place of empathy and openheartedness.

Tim Hawkinson
Garden Variety
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

March 26, 2016 - May 7, 2016
Image: Tim Hawkinson, Egg-shell Star burst, 2016, egg shells and cyanoacrylate. Courtesy of the artist and Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.

Particle and Wave
260 Utah Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

February 6, 2016 - March 19, 2016
Image: Bruce Connor, Sound of Two Hand Angel, 1974, photogram. Photo: Ben Blackwell. Image courtesy of the artist and Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco.