515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011
212 206 9300

Also at:
530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011
212 206 7606



Artists Represented:
Ricci Albenda
Richard Aldrich
Allora & Calzadilla
Kai Althoff
Miroslaw Balka
Matthew Barney
Robert Bechtle
Alighiero Boetti
Kasper Bosmans
Claudia Comte
Carroll Dunham
Cecilia Edefalk
Roe Ethridge
Cyprien Gaillard
Keith Haring
Thomas Hirschhorn
Jim Hodges
Huang Yong Ping
Cameron Jamie
Anish Kapoor
Sol Lewitt
Sharon Lockhart
Andrew Lord
Sarah Lucas
Victor Man
Fausto Melotti
Mario Merz
Marisa Merz
Dave Muller
Wangechi Mutu
Jean-Luc Mylayne
Shirin Neshat
Damián Ortega
Philippe Parreno
Elizabeth Peyton
Walter Pichler
Magnus Plessen
R. H. Quaytman
Ugo Rondinone
Gedi Sibony
Jack Smith Archive
Walter Swennen
Rosemarie Trockel
Banks Violette
Paloma Varga Weisz
Andro Wekua
T. J. Wilcox
Michael Williams

 
Past Exhibitions

Shirin Neshat
Dreamers
515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

May 19, 2017 - June 17, 2017
Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Shirin Neshat featuring a film and a related series of photographs. Through charged imagery and evocative mise-en-scène, Neshat’s photography and film installations critique the cultural construction of difference. This exhibition marks the first time she fully turns her attention to American culture, dissecting the tense and querying experience of being an Iranian in the United States today. In both the film Roja and a new series of photographs, Neshat confronts the ambivalence of living across two cultures and how it coheres to both personal and political identity. To tackle the ambiguous status of the outsider, she utilizes enigmatic images, haunting encounters, and mystified points of view influenced by the surrealist films of Man Ray and Maya Deren. She mobilizes dream logic to represent the disorienting complexity of this fraught subject position and to make visible the double binds of intersectional identity. Roja (2016), drawn from Neshat’s own recur­ring dreams, mem­o­ries, and desires, traces an Iranian woman's disquieting attempts at connection with American culture while reconciling her identification with her home country. Encountering her own sense of alienation from both, the titular protagonist experiences how both the foreign and the familiar can become unnerving and hostile. Neshat undermines Roja’s social and affective attachments—from a cabaret performance that becomes a nightmarish challenge to her identity, to a recovery of familial bonds that turns increasingly frightening. Throughout the film, she estranges American landscapes—the utopic attempts of government architecture and coalmines that evoke the terrain of the Middle East—to situate Roja within an ambiguous psychic and political terrain. Using non­lin­ear nar­ra­tives and destabilizing in-cam­era techniques, the film questions the relationships that tie us to the world and reveals the transcendence of release into spaces unbounded by socio-historical demarcations. Along with the film, new photographs also represent a departure for Neshat. Well-known for her portrait series in which calligraphy quoting religious texts and poetry enliven the contours of the face, the series takes as it subjects white men and women from the United States, many of who also appear in Roja. Obscured and blurry, these portraits become a metaphor for the mystifications that enforce cultural boundaries and question how socially constructed difference limits sympathetic attachments across race, class, and nationality. Taken together, the film and the photographs open up the discourse of identity beyond a minoritizing view and seek to reconcile global diversity on both the local and psychic registers. Shirin Neshat is an Iranian-born artist and filmmaker living in New York. Neshat is currently the subject of an exhibition at the Museo Correr, an official corollary event to the 57th Biennale di Venezia. She has mounted numerous solo exhibitions at museums internationally, including: the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C.; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; the Serpentine Gallery, London; Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin; and the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal. A major retrospective of her work was exhibited at the Detroit Institute of Arts in 2013. Neshat was awarded the Golden Lion Award, the First International Prize at the 48th Biennale di Venezia (1999), the Hiroshima Freedom Prize (2005), and the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize (2006). In 2009, Neshat directed her first feature-length film, Women Without Men, which received the Silver Lion Award for “Best Director” at the 66th Venice International Film Festival. Neshat is currently completing her second feature-length film, entitled Looking For Oum Kulthoum.

Cameron Jamie
Domestic Arenas: Massage the History, BB, Kranky Klaus
530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

April 28, 2017 - June 17, 2017
Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of three films by artist Cameron Jamie, spanning a decade of work. This installation marks the first time that Jamie has programmed these films, including BB (1998-2000), Kranky Klaus (2002-2003), and Massage the History (2007-2009), to focus on the theme of the home as a site of intersection between public and private rituals. In each of these works, the proximity to his subjects allows him to reveal the uncanny in the cultural fabric. Finding subject matter in diverse fields of play—from the suburban backyards of Los Angeles, to the living rooms of the American South and Alpine villages of Central Europe—these three works investigate the ritualized performativity of violence, arcane tradition, and sexuality. Moving between interior and exterior spaces, the film program traces a mental map connecting rites of passage in different cultures. Additionally, rock bands The Melvins and Sonic Youth, who have expanded the language of rock music, provide hallucinatory soundscapes that are an integral aspect of the films. Massage the History records amateur dancers, whom Jamie found accidentally online, who freely engage the quotidian domestic scene with their own sexually suggestive movements. Unintended for an actual audience, the automatic nature of their body language evolves from an intimate spectacle into a dreamlike scenario of transcendence through onanistic desire. BB captures the semi-choreographed brawls of Southern Californian teens who mimic the movements seen on popular TV wrestling shows. Shot on Super-8, Jamie’s film transforms their raw makeshift arena into a social theater of primitive adolescent vaudeville. The rock drone soundtrack provided by The Melvins creates an atemporal space that simultaneously unravels and builds toward its Wagnerian conclusion. Kranky Klaus documents the pagan Christmas celebration of the Krampus—a menacing devil/monster character—in the Alpine villages of Austria’s Bad Gastein Valley where St. Nicolas leads participants costumed in horns and fur in a sanctioned ritual of harassment. The film becomes a morality play exploring the cultural symbiosis of good and evil and how violence socializes through performances of cathartic abuses. Cameron Jamie was born in Los Angeles in 1969 and has lived in France since 2000. Jamie will be the subject of a forthcoming retrospective at MAC Lyon in 2018. Presently, he is featured in The Absent Museum at Wiels, Brussels and was most recently included in The Infinite Mix at the Hayward Gallery in 2016. Jamie has been the subject of museum surveys at the Kunsthalle Zurich (2013) and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2006), traveling to the MIT List Visual Arts Center. Jamie has been featured in film festivals and major group exhibitions including Traces du sacré at Centre Georges Pompidou (2008), the Berlin Biennial (2010), the Whitney Biennial (2006), the Venice Biennale (2005), and the 2015 Lyon Biennale. In 2008 Jamie was the first recipient of the Yanghyun Prize and in 2016 was awarded the Daniel and Florence Guerlain Art Foundation prize for drawing.

Michael Williams
515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

March 31, 2017 - May 6, 2017

Wangechi Mutu
Ndoro Na Miti
530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

January 27, 2017 - March 25, 2017
Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Wangechi Mutu. The title for this exhibition comes from the Gikuyu words for mud and trees, the prima materia for this body of work. Expanding her sculptural practice, this installation proposes an alternative to the systemic modes of representation in both Western and Eastern traditions by reimagining and recontextualizing the relations between the body, the natural world, and social forces. Well known for collages of hybrid forms drawn from folklore, popular culture, and art history, this new work marks an evolution in Mutu’s critique of the construction of self-image. The complex texture and form that these figures offer prompt inquiry into the relationship between human existence and environment, producing interactions both intimate and challenging. Mutu transforms the gallery space into a terrestrial cosmology that spans the microscopic to the mythic. Drawn from the dirt and brush in areas around her studio, she conjures a world replete with chimerical paradox. Faces of women, ornamental footwear, and patterned spheres evoking viruses emerge from natural materials that elaborate on the traditions of makonde carving. Embracing the raw physicality of her surroundings, she mobilizes the earth as a continuation of her own complex intersectional identity and artistic query. Adding gravity to these roughhewn totems, each invokes the psychic and social struggle for control over bodies through capitalism, the fetish, and disease. Seating of grey blankets grounds the installation, inviting audiences “to enter a place and re-think themselves.” This environment sets the stage for two new cast bronze sculptures that directly confront the myths of representation. A large-scale sculpture of an nguva, a water-woman of East African folklore, is at once familiar and otherworldly. Based on the transformation of the aquatic dugong, an herbivore closely related to the manatee, into the siren of superstition, Mutu staves off the disappearance of biological diversity and traditions of mythmaking by coalescing what she calls “the cross-pollination of ideas” into objects of desire. In another work, Second Dreamer (2016), she challenges the stasis of the bust and the appropriation of African masks through a self-portrait that captures the potential of psychic life. In this way, Mutu’s sculpture acts as a corrective to a violent cultural consciousness, while offering an alternative narrative of embodiment and being in the world. Born in Nairobi, Kenya, Wangechi Mutu received her MFA from Yale University. Her work has been the subject of numerous solo shows, including, “Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey”, which traveled to: Brooklyn Museum, New York; Nasher Museum of Art, Durham, North Carolina; Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami; and Block Museum, Evanston, Illinois. Other solo exhibitions include: SITE, Santa Fe; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal; Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin; Wiels Center for Contemporary Art, Brussels; Art Gallery of Ontario; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Kunsthalle Wien; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Mutu is the recipient of Deutsche Bank’s “Artist of the Year” award, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant, the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters & Sculptors Award, and the American Federation of Arts’ Leadership Award. In the coming year, Mutu will present solo exhibitions at Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle, Belgium and The Contemporary Austin, Texas.

Jim Hodges
I dreamed a world and called it Love.
530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

November 11, 2016 - December 21, 2016

Mario Merz
Early Works
515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

November 10, 2016 - December 17, 2016

Ugo Rondinone
the sun at 4pm
530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

September 23, 2016 - October 29, 2016

Matthew Barney
Facility of DECLINE
515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

September 9, 2016 - September 24, 2016

See sun, and think shadow
515 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011

June 23, 2016 - July 29, 2016

Anish Kapoor
Today You Will Be in Paradise
530 West 21st Street
New York, NY 10011

May 4, 2016 - June 11, 2016